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REFLECTOR 



WEYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL ... WEYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Class Motto . . . 

Hope, Honor, Happiness 
ClaSS Colors . . . Blue and Gold 



YEAR 




1940 




W"e, the Class of 1940, wish to dedicate our year- 
book to Mr. Charles R. Thibadeau, Super- 
intendent of the Weymouth Schools. May he 
find success, happiness, and co-operation throughout 
his years in Weymouth. 



DEDICflTIOn 



Class Ode 



To-day we leave these ivied walls 
Hallowed by memories of cheer; 
For we have gained new friends and old 
That dearer grow each passing year. 
Our lives before us stretch unknown, 
Perhaps away from our abode, 
Each to fulfill the destiny 
That Fate has marked along Life's road. 
Whate'er the future holds for us, 
Though filled with happiness or woe, 
Pray God that we may always keep 
The vision clear where'er we go. 

Alan Sampson '40 



Four Year Honor Roll 



Rita Bowie Ruth Gillis 

Rosemary Chaplin Charlotte MacLeod 

Robert Coleman Lea Tacconelli 

Dorothy Condrick Alered Thompson 

Elizabeth Ellard Virginia Wallace 



G . . . 





EHtEmt5 

r cunn I 



Dedication 5 

Class Ode and Four Year Honor Roll 6 

Class Ode and Four— Year Honor Roll ....... 6 

Class Officers n 

Vocational Officers 12 

Salutatory Address 13 

Valedictory Address 17 

Class Census 20 

Class History 21 

Class Will 28 

Class Prophecy 29 

Senior Section and Who's Who 43 

School Activities 99 

Baby Parade 120 

Advertisements 129 



...7 




FACULTY 



WALLACE L. WHITTLE, Principal 
Highly-erected thoughts seated in the heart of 
courtesy. 



I HOMAS A. LYONS, Assistant Principal 
Mathematics 

folly, helpful, and kind. 
Such a man you rarely find. 

VELMA E. ABBOTT, Clerk 

III for a friend and a friend for all. 

HARRY ARLANSON, Coach, Mathematics, 
Science 

"Now I leant to see all of you at the game 
Saturday." 

PAUL H. BATES, French 
As a golfer he is good, 
At the piano he is better, 
But as a "Frenchman" he is best. 



ESTHER L. BENSON, Home Economics 
Sincerity and warmth shine beneath 
dignity. 



her 



BARBARA R. BICKNELL, Mathematics, Science 
Fair and tall as teachers go, 
Here is one you all should know. 

PRESCOTT B. BROWN, English, History 
You'll reach the goal you strive to win, 
Because you work and work with vim. 

ERNESTINE R. CANNING, French 
Kind and generous with her time, 
She gives all to help us climb. 

PAUL C. CLEAVES, English 
Moderation, the noblest gift from heaven. 

MARIE E. CONROY. French 
T rue as the dial to the sun, 
Although it be not shone upon. 

JOHN K. DELAHUNT, Economics, Science 
The proper study of mankind is man. 

BEATRICE ESCOTT, Sewing 
Much can be accomplished from patience. 

ALIiCE K. FAY, Commercial 
Gentle in manner, firm in reality. 



ELEANOR FREEMAN, English. German 
A loyal friend sincere and true. 
With a sense of humor and keen mind, too. 

JOHN T. GANNON, Latin 
Good teacher, fine coach, 
Disposition above reproach. 

JOHN t. GHIORSE, English, History, Science 

Few things are impossible to diligence and 

skill. 

SHEILA M. GROSS, Librarian 
She was a shrewd philosopher; 
She had read every text and gloss over. 

WALTER C. GUTTERSON, Citizenship, Eng- 
lish, History 

Although his safety class is new, 

We feel it surely will come through. 

OLIVE E. HACKETT, Commercial 

Difficulties dissolve before a cheerful spirit. 

KATHARINE M. HALE, English, History 
Science 

I value science; none can prize it more; 
It gives ten thousand motives to adore. 

INEZ E. HOAG, Physical Education 
Always alert and on her toes. 

EVERETT N. HOLLIS, Commercial 
Short of stature, long in wit. 

LILLIAN JEFTS, Spanish 

The secret of success is constancy to purpose. 

DOROTHY A. JENKINS, Commercial 
'Tis good to be merry and wise. 

PHILIP T. JONES, Commercial 

Personality along with confidence helps make 
a man a sucess. 

FRANCIS X. KELLY, Commercial 

A good laugh is sunshine in the house. 

MARY M. LAMBE, Assistant Clerk 
Mary is a lamb, 
As many of us know, 
Reliable ajnd merry, 
Yet quiet with a glow. 



Ft >nt Kow Margaret K. Langford. M. Jean Young, Virginia Nye, Beatrice Escrftt, Dorothy MacGregor, 
Helena Reidy, Inez Hoag, Dorothy Jenkins. Velma Abbott, Herberta Stockwell. Ernestine Canning. Anita 
Petrucci; Second Row: Francis Whipple, Alice White. Helen Norris. Mary Lambe, Barbara Biknell. Esther 
Benson. Olive Hackett. Katherine Hale, Eleanor Madigan. Marie Conroy. Alice Fay. Madeline Wilson. 
Elizabeth Rogers. Wallace L. Whittle, Principal; Third Row: Jalmar Nelson. Alvah Raymond, James Booth. 
Waldo Swan, Norman Loud. Hilmer Nelson, George McCarthy. Francis Martin. Oral Page, Paul Cleaves, 
John Delahunt. Jack Sturtevant, Francis Kelly; Fourth Row: Helen Lyons, Dorothy Peterson. Evelyn Sil- 
vester. Sheila Gross, Eva Skala, Lillian Jefts. Rose Silverman; Fifth Row: Horold Clarke, John Ghioree. 
Harry Arlanson, Harold Sherwood, Paul Bates, John Gannon, Lewis Bacon. Philip Jones, Harry Duncan. 
James Steele. Robert Mitchell. Clarence Lyond, Walter Gutterson; Sixth Row: James Boland. Melvin Little, 
Thomas Lyons, Joseph Whittemore, Everett Hollis, Everett Bryan, Prescott Brown. Ray Parker. 



MARGARET K. LANGFORD, Commercial 

Gentle and fine, simple and kind, was she, 
With generous speech to all and gladsome 
looks. 

NORMAN D. LOUD, Science 
His versatility is renowned, 
His music has a pleasing sound, 
His knowledge of science, you must admit, 
Is a challenge indeed to the best of wit. 

CLARENCE R. LYOND, Science 

Mr. Lyond does his bit, 

To see that wisdom is flavored with wit. 
HELEN G. LYONS, English, History 

Never changing, aheays smiling. 

DOROTHY G. MacGREGOR, Commercial 
The most manifest sign of wisdom is contin- 
ued cheerfulness. 

ELEANOR R. MADIGAN, Commercial 
A song in her heart, a smile on her face, 
This petite teacher is filled with grace. 

JOHN F. MARTIN, History, Latin 
They that govern most make the least noise. 

GEORGE J. MCCARTHY, Commercial 
Men of few words are the best men. 

MARY E. McMORROW, English 
Teaching freshmen pronunciation 
Has established her a reputation. 

ROBERT E. MITCHELL, Commercial 

He that hath knowledge spareth his -words. 

HELEN M. NORRIS, Commercial 

Miss Norris has us all agog. 

With the way she teaches us "stenog". 
VIRGINIA NYE, English 

Stern and severe we were told, 

But we discovered a heart of gold. 

ORAL A. PAGE, Physical Education 

Who is the Hercules of the age? 

Why, it is plainly Oral Page. 
DOROTHY L. PETERSON, Physical Education 

Happy and merry all the day, 

Friendly and jolly in every way. 



ANITA L. PETRUCCI, English, French 
Thy modesty's a candle to thy merit. 

ALVAH RAYMOND, Mathematics, Science 
No juster man could be, 
Ask any scout and see. 

HELENA F. REIDY, Latin 
Here's to a teacher with willing hands and a 
"Reidy" smile. 

SUSAN G. SHEEHAN, English, Mathematics 
Kind hearts are more than coronets. 

ROSE SILVERMAN, Commercial 
So clever and effecient does she seem 
J'lial we all hold her in high esteem. 

EVELYN SILVESTER, Drawing 

Will her amazing abilities ever cease? 

EVA SK.ALA, Home Economics 
.1 gentle tongue that strengthens one's cour- 
age. 

JAMES F. STEELE, English, History 
A man as true as steel. 

(.FORGE O. S I h W ART, Mathematics 

His friendly spirit and enthusiasm are an 

inspiration to all. 

Ill RBERTA L. STOCKWELL, Nurse 
A perfect woman, nobly planned 
To warn, to comfort, and command. 
MARTHA VINING, Latin 
She has a calm and pleasant air, 
And to us all she is most fair. 
ALICE WHITE, English 
She is small, sparkling, and gay, 
Yet capable and clever in every way. 
DORA S. WHITE (MRS.) , English, History 
Wisdom 
High 
Is 

True 

Ecstasy 

M. JEAN YOUNG, Commercial 
Here is one serene and calm, 
Adding a lot to all her charm. 



Vocational School 



FRANCIS E. WHIPPLE, Director 
Brisk, business-like, dependable. 

LEWIS BACON. Auto Repair 
Silent, calm, reserved. 

JAMES F. BOLAND, Sheet Metal 

Nice manners and a winning way. 

JAMES A. BOOTH, Jr., Sheet Metal 
A toast to a grand fellow. 

D. EVERETT BRYAN, Auto Repair 
A man of few words. 

HAROLD E. CLARKE, Sheet Metal 
Actions speak louder than words. 

HARRY F. DUNCAN, Printing 
Not too serious, not too gay— a good fellow. 



OTTO H. MAHN, Printing 
Sloiu and steady wins the race. 

JALMAR N. NELSON, Mathematics, Social Arts 

Hearts flutter when he goes by. 

RAY G. PARKER, Mechanical Drawing 
Sure, steady, serene, calm. 

HAROLD C. SHERWOOD, Cabinetmaking 
Easy come, easy go. 

WALDO H. SWAN, English, Science 

What lies beyond that quiet exterior? 

JOSEPH K. WHITTEMORE, Citizenship, 
English, History 
He lives long that lives well. 



Agricultural School 



HILMER S. NELSON, Director JACK STURTEVANT, Assistant 

The inborn geniality of some people amounts The happiest he who far from public eye, 

Deep in the vale, with a choice few retired, 
Drinks the pure pleasures of the rural life. 
10 . . . 



to genius. 




OLIVER T. VIRTA, Vocational School Class President 
GARLAND H. HAY, Vice-President GUIDO CAVALLO, Secretary-Treasurer 

JOHN T. GUNN, Class Marshal 



SALUTATORY ADDRESS 
M 

^Education for Living" 

Rl'TH ELINOR CILLIS 

Friends of the class of 1940, we are happy to welcome you to our graduation. 
Mothers and fathers, we greet you fondly, and thank you sincerely for the 
many sacrifices you have made for us during our school years. 

Mr. Thibadeau and members of the school committee, we appreciate the 
opportunities and advantages we have had in the Weymouth schools. 

Mr. Whittle and teachers, for your wise counsel and patient guidance, we 
are deeply grateful. 

Civilization, with its rapid changes and its constantly increasing demands, is 
dying for leaders to carry the world out of the chaotic state into which it has 
been plunged. Turbulent conditions have taught us that something is lacking. 
Tottering national states and crumbling economic systems in Europe emphasize 
this fact. Surely civilization, with its highly industrial developeinent, with its 
breath-taking mechanical and labor-saving improvements, has not started to 
decline. All these modern inventions cannot mark the recession of a once proud 
and lofty advancement. Where shall we find the remedy to the situation? 

The remedy can be found in the educational systems of nations. Abroad, these 
systems have produced powerful masters of men, bul not necessarily great lead- 
ers. These masters have been able to steer such invention into channels for 
which they were never intended. They have turned them from machines of con- 
struction and beauty, into machines of destruction and horror. In America, our un- 
paralleled system of education has produced great leaders, men who regard dem- 
ocracy as a priceless possession. 

Let us consider, for a moment, the story of the system which has produced 
these leaders. 

In the early period of American history, our educational institutions were 
formed primarily for religious instruction. However, the demand for tax-sup- 
ported public schools soon arose. With Massachusetts paving the way by law in 
1642 and 1647, public schools became a reality. The extension of suffrage in 1830 
created new political motives for education, destined to supersede the old re- 
ligious motive. 

Progress after this was remarkable. The educational awakening of this period 
practically settled the destiny of our free America. Free schools were established. 
Later, compulsory attendance laws were enacted, and agricultural courses and 
trade schools were introduced. From this time on, the democratization of our 

14 . . . 



public schools has placed the advantages of a secondary education within the 
reach of practically every boy and girl in the United States. 

ward certain ideals which constitute the foundations of democratic government. 
It is upon ideals such as the general welfare, civil liberty, the consent of the gov- 
erned, and the pursuit of happiness that our school systems have been built. An 
analysis of each of these will show us the purpose of our educational plan. 

First, the general welfare springs from our regard for those about us. Those 
who profess the democratic ideal are interested in the welfare of all. Tolerance, 
and the respect for the will of the majority, is of the greatest importance for the 
happiness and security of every individual in a democracy. 

Second, civil liberty is the essence of all freedom. From it we obtain our in- 
dividual rights; and these produce our individual responsibilities. 

Third, the consent of the governed is the basis of all democratic action. Our 
education must prepare us to use wisely the power given to us by the ballot, lest 

The part that education plays in moulding the thoughts of a nation is of 
tremendous importance. In the United States, education has been directed to- 
our government be impaired by ignorance or indifference. 

Finally, the pursuit of happiness is the measure of success in a democracy. 
Human happiness is the goal toward which democratic action points. To live and 
let live in peace and friendship is the goal of social living. 

What are the effects of our public school system in America? First, consistent 
with the philosophy of government under which we live, the federal government, 
although contributing greatly to the support of public schools, leaves their or- 
ganization and management to state and local authority. Second, freedom of re- 
ligion has been established throughout the land. Third, the solution of the many 
new social problems has been effected in a sane and reasonable manner. 

The equality and the freedom that surround American schools best teach 
the student the meaning of democracy, and, just as important, teaches him not 
to abuse his many privileges. It is, therefore, in every free public school of Amer- 
ica that democracy has its strength. 

Those steps that have been taken in the field of education are proof enough 
of the ever-growing conviction that, for its success, democracy depends on the 
spread of knowledge and on well-trained, intelligent citizens. 

The problem of future public school education will depend upon us. We 
w ho are viewing the rise of many new social problems shall be asked to make 
decisions upon them. Shall we continue to follow the democratic ideal of our 
predecessors? The success which our government has already attained should 
guide us in promoting education for living. 

For in the words of the British statesman, Lord Brougham: "Education makes 
people easy to lead, but difficult to drive; easy to govern, but impossible to en- 
slave." 



t is with deepest sorrow that we pause in tribute 
to Douglas Glancy. Doug's sincerity, earnestness, 
and pleasing personality endeared him to his 
classmates and teachers alike. (We shall long remem- 
ber him. His honesty and good will toward his fellow 
students, will make his memory live forever. Doug's 
quiet, unassuming manner caused him to be held in 
the highest respect by all the pupils of our school. 




VALEDICTORY ADDRESS 
■ 

"America in a World at War" 

MARY VIRGINIA WALLACE 

When an Athenian youth completed his education, he became a citizen. 
We, however, are more fortunate. The great gift of citizenship is be- 
stowed upon most of ns at birth. And to-day, our graduation day, we 
are reaching a milestone in our lives— a coming of age. At once we ask ourselves 
this question: "What kind ol countr) is this into which we arc coining of age?" 
There are many different points to consider in answering this question, but we 
lake only one; namely, America's relationship with the rest of the world. 

Let us remember a few facts. Here is a land favorably situated in the West- 
ern Hemisphere, with friendly neighbors to the north and south, and wide oceans 
to the east and west. This land, although covering only one twentieth of the 
surface of the earth, excels in resources any comparable place. We have rich soil, 
coal, iron, oil, and almost all other minerals. Our people have come from every 
corner of the world, and have lived together in peace for generations. Our con- 
stitutional government is the oldest existing government under a written constitu- 
tion. These are some of the facts which give our country an unlimited oppor- 
tunity to develop, to acquire, and to enjoy. 

Although we are more self-sufficient than any other nation, our interests are 
not centered wholly within ourselves. We must also consider our relations with 
other countries. When man invented the wheel and axle, he forged the first 
weapon with which to destroy his own isolation, and when he put unlimited, tire- 
less power behind that wheel, he destroyed all possibility of isolation wherever 
wheels could turn. 

At the present time, an unbiased analysis is necessary to an intelligent under- 
standing of existing conditions and problems, and to the formation and pursuit 
of any policy which will insure for the United States, and the rest of the world a 
lasting peace. If only the devastating nature of modern warfare could be realized, 
and intelligence and reasoning alone were the deciding factors, co-operation, toler- 
ance, and mutual helpfulness would at once replace greed, jealousy, and fear. 

Such, however, is not the condition, since competition and expansion arise. 
With expansion and competition comes the need for more colonies. These are 
valuable not only as strategic points, but also as markets for manufactured goods 
and as a source of raw materials. The story of Japanese aggression serves as an 
example. This country had no interest in colonies and no desire for them, until 
she needed markets for her newly created industries, and homes for her rapidly 
increasing millions. 

18 . . . 



We know the horror of war. The forty-one millions of people who died, 
either directly or indirectly, as a result of the last World War and the billions in 
wealth lost, will stand forever as a monument to that tragedy. Confronted by these 
facts, we realize how willing and anxious we have always been to aid the cause of 
peace in any way that did not jeopardize our own position. 

Now, more than ever, we also realize that the United States has become a res- 
ervoir of hope for a humane and democratic order among men. Those who are to 
fulfill the mission of rebuilding a world empire from which the threat of war and 
violence may be removed, can approach their task best, if their hands are un- 
stained by blood, their spirits uncorroded by hatred, and their minds uncrippled 
by months or years of wartime regimentation. 

Therefore, to-day let us dedicate ourselves to the preservation and continua- 
tion of the principles embodied in democratic government, and in the words of 
Washington, "let us raise a standard to which the wise and honest may repair." 

Mothers and fathers, for your unselfish care and loving inspiration, may we 
express our deepest love and appreciation. Our future ideals and conduct will 
be governed by the rich background which you have established for us. 

Mr. Thibadeau and members of the School Committee, we thank you for 
the educational advantages that you have made possible for us to enjoy during 
our academic training. 

Mr. Whittle and teachers, we are deeply grateful for your leadership, kind- 
liness, and friendship. May we always be guided by those sterling ideals with 
which you have influenced us. 

Classmates, to-day we stand facing a new life, inspired by the rich experi- 
ences of the past and enriched with high ideals for the future. We have com- 
pleted the last link in Weymouth's educational system, and we look with con- 
fidence to the years before us. May we find hope in a lifetime of service, honor in 
our actions, and happiness in the fulfillment of our ideals. Then we will have 
realized the aims of our class motto, "Hope, Honor, Happiness." 



l 9 



n young life there are few truly hard jolts to be 
borne. But the tragic, unforseen death of Frank 
Hersey served to sober the minds of all his school 
friends, however happy-go-lucky or care-free they may 
have been. The mind of youth forgets easily and to 
most of you his death is just a sad and unpredicted 
occurence. But to a few of us the swifi departure of 
our friend from this world has impressed on our minds 
with terrifying vividness that horrible thing which, 
sooner or later, comes to all of us— the loss of a loved 
one. 

Frank was a very quiet youth with a serious out- 
look on life. However, he possessed ;i sense of humor 
interwoven with generosity to everyone and a great 
kindness to both his friends and pets. Something we 
all deeply admired in Frank was his determination 
to succeed in whatever he undertook. 

We, Frank's classmates, wish at this time to pay a 
loving tribute to our departed comrade. 

A Schoolmate 




The wind outside was howling, and the snow was beginning to fall gently, 
while inside a luxurious home, seated comfortably in Iron; of a w ide, ope n 
fireplace, was Fred Slattery. His thoughts were on the happ) days he had 
spent at Weymouth High. As he closed his tired eyes, he could visualize the 
group made up of his former classmates discussing the activities oi the class of '40: 



CHARACTERS IN ORDER OE APPEARANCE 



Fred 


Frederick Slattery 


'Laine 


Elaine Clapp 


Mr. Ghiorse 


Mr. Ghiorse 


Tomin le 


Thomas Kelly 


Bob 


Robert MacArthur 


Kennie 


Kenneth Ralph 


Joe the Blow- 


Joseph Donahoe 


Tot 


Wendell Totinan 


Jim 


James Pearce 


Margie 


Marjorie Horn 


Eileen 


Eileen Slattery 


Barb 


Barbara Cheverie 


Miriam 


Miriam McCue 


Goke 


James Consentino 


Vaughan 


John Vaughan 


Polly- 


Pauline House 


Al 


Alfred Thompson 


Jean 


Jean Macafec 


J- T. 


John Gunn 


Eddie 


Edwina Barnes 


Moose 


John Mulligan 


Gini 


Virginia Doyle 


Rose 


Rosemary Hackett 


Keby 


Josephine Keblis 


Mary 


Mary Dwyer 


Sammy 


Alan Sampson 


Portia 


Portia Stanton 


Curt 


Curtis Gladwin 


Moe 


Mario Gatto 


Cyn 


Cynthia Cowing 


Gumpy 


George Andersen 


Muriel 


Muriel Blackwell 


Ken 


Kenneth Loring 








Act I, 


Scene I 




Time: September, 1936 






Setting: The 


Freshman Door of the 


Weymouth 


High School 


Stage Directors: 


Joe the Blow and B 


ob walk in 





Mr. Ghiorse: Here, you two boys, hurry up, and go to your home room. 

Bob. We're sorry Mr. er Mr.-er-ah teacher, but we don't know where our home 
rooms are. 

Mr. Ghiorse. What are your names? 

Joe the Blow. Mine's Blow, I mean Donahoe. 

Bob. Mine's MacArthur. 

Mr. Ghiorse. Well, MacArthur, your home room is 113, and, Donahoe, yours 
is 101. 

Joe and Bob. Thank you! 

Joe the Blow. Gee, Bob, this is a big place. 

Bob. You're telling me! Sh! We better not talk any more. I heard the rules are 
strict here, and we might get expelled. 

22 . . . 



Act I, Scene II 

Time: Tlie Freshman Senior Dance 

Jim. Holy Smoke, Tom, look at the girls. Let's get out of here before one 
of them makes us dance with her. Oh, Oh, we're sunk. Here come the girls 
now. 

Pretty Senior Girls. Hello, boys. Would you care to be my partner for the next 
dance? Hey, come back here! Grab them, Ruth. O. K. You thought you 
could slip out on me, did you? Well, you come out and dance with mel 

Jim. Aw, Sadie Hawkins' day! I can't dance, ma. 

Act I, Scene III 
Setting: A lecture on "American Treatment of the Indians." 
Eileen. You know, Miriam, high school isn't so bad as I thought it was going to 

be. Why, already we have had a dance and three good lectures— one on liquid 

air by Mr. Plumber, one on "Eskimo Land", and now one on 'American 

Treatment of Indians." 
Miriam. Yes, I'm beginning to like the old place myself. Say, I hear that if our 

football team keeps up the good work we'll win the Class B Championship. 

Then we'll have a swell Victory Dance. 
Eileen. Yes, and you know the teachers are working on a play called "The Three 

Wise Fools." It should be good. Come on! There's the bell! Let's get out of 
here. 

Act I, Scene IV 

Setting: Sixth period of the day in which the Herald Traveler Spelling Bee was 
held. 

Vaughan: Gee, I don't see how anyone can spell all the words Ken did, correctly. 

What word did you fail on? 
Al. I don't know. It was an easy one. The girl behind me spelled it just like 

that. (Snaps his fingers.) I never was a good speller, anyway. Are you 

going to be in the "Musical Review"? 
Vaughan: No, I'm going to see it, though. It's going to be swell. 

Act I Scene V 

Time: Last day of the year. 

Connie: Well, here it is the last day of school. When I look back, I can't say we 
have had such a bad time at that. There have been a good many interesting 
things going on all the year. By the way, did you see the Senior Play, "Sun 
Up"? I didn't see you there. 

Betty: Yes, I saw it. It was pretty good too. Oh, oh, there is the bell! I've got 
to run and get a seat on the bus. See you next year, sophomore. 

Act II, Scene I 
Time: Thanksgiving Day, Sophomore Year. 
Place: Hingham. 

J. T.: Boy, what a game that was! 
Moose: Pretty close, though, 6-0. 



23 



Rose: Are you going to the annual banquet on December ninth? I suppose all 
the senior members will receive their sweaters then. 

Act II, Scene II 

Time: January 14, 1938. 
Place: Boys' Gym. 

Mary: Oh, I'm glad they gave Mr. Calderwood a sweater. He really deserved 

something like that. 
Portia: Yes, and just think! Weymouth won the South Shore Championship. 
Moe: We sure had a wonderful time here to-niglK. That orchestra was good 

wasn't it? It's the best Athletic Dance I've ever been to. 

Act II, Scene III 

Time: April 29, 1938. 
Place: Boys' Gym. 

Gumpy: Well, what did you think of the Senior Prom, "Ken?" 
Ken: Oh, it was swell, and that was some band that played to-night. 

Act II, Scene III 

Time: June 10, 1938. 
Place: Auditorium. 

Elaine: I'm sure glad I came to the Senior Play. 

Tommy: So am I. By the way , did you see the operetta, "Trial By Jury"?' It was 
very good, but quite different from "Craig's Wife", the Teachers' Play. 

Ken: Oh, yes! Do you remember Miss Norris, who played the part of the self- 
centered wife? 

Act III, Scene I 

Time: Junior Year. 

Place: Junior High Wing-Second Floor. 
Setting: Anv room in W. H. S. 

Tot: Dr. Barker's lecture was of great interest, and his points on "How To 
Make a Success of Yourself," caused us to think seriously of the future. 

Portia. The educational lecture by the attorney of "Crime Does Not Pay" was 
equally interesting. 

Margie. The "Safety" movie given by the Chevrolet Motor Company which 
showed the disasters of the road, and the one of "The Old West", were 
enjoyed by all. 

Tommy. Those lectures and movies were excellent contributions to our junior 
year, but remember the gay old time we had at the "pep" meetings c*n 
Friday afternoons, followed by the football games on Saturday, in which 
the W. H. S. team showed its dexterity. Don't forget, also, the beautiful 
"Alma Mater" written by John T. Ghiorse and Norman Loud and dedi- 
cated to the late Mr. Hilton, our beloved principal. 

Act III, Scene II 

Setting: The same popular students are heard again, this time, going over some 
interesting matter. 

Tot. The wrestling team did excellent work, winning the Tufts Tournament. 



-'1 



Portia. Our football team showed its athletic abilities in the games and its pref- 
erence for a captain for '39 in choosing Mario Gatto. 

Margie. Our class's ability to select it's officers with the necessary requirements 
brought about the election of Fred Slattery, president; Alan Sampson, vice- 
president; Virginia Doyle, secretary; and Josephine Keblis, treasurer. 

Tommy. The dramatic activities of W. H. S. were expressed in the Teachers' 
Play, "George and Margaret", and the musical talent of the Glee Club in 
the operetta, "Chimes of Normandy." 

Act III, Scene III 

Setting: High School grounds. Students are summarizing the happy events of the 
Junior Party. 

Barb. The party was very successful with the W. H. S. band supplying the essen- 
tial dance music. 

Coke. The style show given by the junior boys and in which the graceful figures 
of our boys were in full view of the spotlight was thoroughly enjoyed. 
The setting shifts to the Steel Pier. 
Polly. Here we are at the end of our trip to quaint little Provincetown. Almost 
all the class attended, and aside from the usual seasickness, everyone had a 
grand and glorious time. 

Act IV, Scene I 

Time: Senior Year. 

Place: Study period in 212— note passing. 

Jean. Say, Eddie, you missed something in not being at school the other day. 
Who do you suppose visited us? 

Eddie. I don't know unless it could have been Mr. Sloane, who demonstrated 
some more experiments with liquid air. 

Jean. No, better than that. It was one of our own brilliant high-school graduates, 
Warren Loud, who was awarded a book, Einstein's and Infeld's, Evolution 
of Physics, by Mr. Kimble, for having received the highest grade in physics. 
Mr. Kimble first talked to us on our life work and the importance of a cor- 
rect decision. He then awarded the book to Warren, who in turn presented 
it to Weymouth High. Oops, there goes the bell! See you at lunch. 

Act IV, Scene II 

Time: One month later. 

Place: The Girls' Gym. Gaily decorated with red and greens characteristic of 
the Christmas season. In one corner stands a lofty, green tree, trimmed with 
tinsel, icicles, and ornaments dangling gaily from each limb. Music echoes 
clearly above the extra voices of a group of seniors standing in the doorway. 

Gini. Well, I never expected to see so many seniors turn out to-night. They sure- 
ly seem to be having a grand time dancing to Bob Olive's high-school orch- 
estra. 

Keby. Yes, and did you notice the teachers? Some of them could show us a thing 
or three about dancing, even "jitterbugging." 



Freddie. The performance of the different home rooms was interesting, wasn't 

it? Every room put on an act that was different. 
Sammy. I think the best part was our ruddy-faced Santa Claus, Mr. Brown. 
Curt. (Gasping for breath) Gee, fellars, see what I got for my present. Gee whiz, 

ain't it swell? 
Gini. What is it? 
Keby. Oh, it's a toy doll. 

Act IV, Scene III 

Time: September 12, 1940. 

Place: Home of Miss Cynthia Cowing. ( The door bell rings and Cynthia 
answers.) 

Cynthia. Why Muriel, am I glad to see you! 

Muriel: Am I glad to see you too. My, you certainly look as if you have had a 
grand summer. You're so tanned! You know the sun is good for you. It 
contains that ultra-violet ray— well, you wait until I finish my training at 
the Deaconess, and I'll give you all the scientfic data on the amount of 
sun one should take. 

Cynthia. That's right, you'll soon be training at the Deaconess, and I'll be off 
to Middlebury. 

Muriel. Remember the lecture at school on "Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of 
Happiness"? Well, I guess that is just about what we'll be doing from now 
on. Really learning all about life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. 

Cynthia. Well, regardless of what is ahead of us, I know I can never forget the 
Senior Prom. I think the decorating committee did a wonderful job in 
creating the oriental atmosphere of cherry blossoms, and Baron Hugo's 
orchestra certainly made you forget all about exams. I really think our 
prom was about the prettiest that there has ever been. 

Muriel. Well, Cynthia, I shall never forget you and all the others in "Tovarich". 
It seems to me that no one could have done a better job than you and 
Charlie Cavanaugh in the leads, as well as all the others in the cast. 

Cynthia. Everyone said it was good. It was a lot of work and fun, too. 

Muriel. I'll bet it was. It makes you feel kind of sad, doesn't it, when you think 
that we'll probably never be all together again as we were at the class 
banquet? 

Cynthia. I know it. Here we are talking like a couple of "has beens" but you are 
right. The memory of the class banquet will be one we shall always cherish. 
Seeing all our teachers there made you realize that it was through their 
effort that our class was able to maintain an unusually high standard in 
scholarship. 

Muriel. Yes, and now that we are out on our own, we realize how much it meant 
to us. Well, Cyn, I really must be going along. I'm sure our class will reflect 
honor on the old home town, don't you think? 

Cynthia. You bet I do. Wait and see. 

(Exit Cynthia and Muriel.) 

26... 



Vocational School History 

Act I, Scene I 

Time: Freshman Year. 
Place: Trade School. 

Setting: Any room in W. J'. S. Popular trade school boys, Peter LeMotte, George 
Duffney and Oliver Virta are discussing past events of their first year. 

Pete. Come to think of it, there are not very many activities in our school that 
the High School does not take part in. 

Gus. Yes, but we took movies of the school. 

Duff. Don't forget the sheet metal course that began in April under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Clarke. 

Pete. Oh yes, and I remember well the addition to the faculty of Mr. Mahn, who 
came to our school to teach in the printing department. 

Act II, Scene I 

Time: Junior Year. 
Place: Trade School. 

Setting: The grounds of W. V. S. Same popular students are going over a few im- 
portant events of their Junior Year. 

Pete. There are really only two important events of this time. The first, of 
course, was the addition of a new member of the school faculty, Mr. 
Booth, who came to our school to help teach the sheet metal course. 

Duff. I can give one guess that the other event is our trip that we took to Fore 
River to see the launching of the airplane carrier, the Wasp. There we en- 
joyed the excitement of seeing the Wasp, but the day ended tragically as 
two naval planes, which were maneuvering in the air in honor of the launch- 
ing, crashed, causing death and disaster. 

Act IV, Scene I 

Time: Senior Year. 
Place: Trade School. 

Setting: Due to the popularity of the sheet metal department , the cast is greatly, 

increased. The same boys are speaking. 
Pete. Did you see the gang that are taking sheet metal this year? 
Duff. Yes, for a new class they are getting a great many new members. 
Gus. Yes, they even had to add a new teacher to the faculty. His name is Mr. 

Boland. 

Act IV, Scene II 
{after the Alumni meeting) 
Pete. Did you go to the alumni meeting last night? 

Duff. It was held, as you know, in the High School Auditorium at eight o'clock 
on February 4, 1940. The boys in the class started off the programme by 
singing songs accompanied with music. Speeches were given and enjoyed by 
all. 

... 27 



*%{4|fe, the Class of 1940, wish to remember in our 
111 last issue of the Reflector Mary B. Thomas, 
(Mrs. William B. Thomas) , whose unselfish 
/ove for our welfare was cherished by all the students 
who came under her care. Her guidance and friend- 
ship always will be an inspiration to us. Many of our 
classmates have been guided by her untiring efforts 
in molding their character for finer men and women 
of the future. Therefore, we wish to express in our 
small way, our deepest gratitude for all her kindnesses. 



Introduction to Class Prophecy, 1940 



A young man was bent over a typewriter, his head in his hands. Stacked 
on the table were piles of typewritten sheets; on the floor, from a waste basket, 
rose a white mountain of crumpled papers attesting to hours of fruitless labor. 
The young man raised his head and moaned, "Oh. if 1 only would get an idea!" 
He had worked so hard on his play, and it was perfect, except lor the character 
of the hero. He needed an inspiration. His eye roved listlessly around the room, 
until he saw a battered picture hanging on the wall. He jumped to his feet, and 
rushed over to it. Under the dim picture were the words "Class of '40". Why, 
here was inspiration enough to write a thousand plays. He looked carlulh at the 
faces, and each one brought back a memory. 



AM BACH, BARBARA 

Barbara is still interested in chemistry. She 
is now experimenting on how to take the odor 
out of sulphur. 

ANDERSEN, GEORGE 

George is now hack at the \\'e\ mouth High 
School, but not Eds a pupil. He is coaching the 
football team. 

ANDERSON, (ARIL 

Cyril is now an accountant for one of Boston's 
leading department stores. 

ANDERSON. MARGARET 

Margaret is now in England, where she is to 
enter the finals of the Women's World's Cham- 
pionship Tennis Matches. 

ANDERSON. MARILYN 

Marilyn has at last achieved her one desire. 
She is now private secretary to the President. 

ANDERSSON, JOHN 

"Andy" is called the second Einstein, having 
solved difficult mathematical problems without 
the aid of pencil and paper. 

ANTONETTL RALPH 

Ralph has recently won the tropin Eor the 
champion golfer of the state. His playing on 
the golf team at Weymouth High School spur- 
red him on to victory. 

ARSENAULT, DOROTHY 

"Dot" is now working for the Wriglev Com- 
pany. She hopes to get back some of the profits 
she spent on their product. 

At STIN, MARY 

Mar) has become such a good swimmer, that 
she's going to try the English Channel next. 

AUSTIN, RALPH 

Ralph has bought the "Old City" part of 
South Weymouth and has a large goat and 
chicken ranch there. 

BADGER, RAYMOND 

"Ray" is a first class pilot on a rocket ship 
operating between the Earth and Mais. He loves 
the wide open spaces. 

SO • • • 



BANKS, MARY 

Mary carries on a correspondence with sev- 
eral people in Scotland. From her foreign 
friends she is learning all about the war, and 
is planning to write a history hook entitled 
"The European Situation." 

BARNES, DORIS 

"Doddie" has won much recognition as a 
'cello player. She is now playing in the New 
York Philharmonic Orchestra. 

BARNES. EDWIN A 

"Eddy" has become very musical latch. She 
is bus) ringing "Bells." 

B \ RRY. CHRISTINE 

"Teena" has registered as a Red Cross Nurse 
in the European War. and is now in charge of 
a hospital in France for wounded soldiers. 

B VTES, ELEANOR 

Eleanor has recently taken up skiing. We 
have a pretty good idea who "Causer" to be 
so enthusiastic over the sport. 

BATES. FLORENCE 

Florence is a designer of women's dresses in 
an exclusive New York shop. As a result of her 
practice at Wev mouth High School, she is now 
one of the best clothes designers in the country. 

BI N I I I Y. ELIZABETH 

Bettv is now private secretary to John Rocke- 
feller. Her practice at Wev mouth High brought 
her that responsible position. 

151 RRY, LILLIAN 

"Bunny" is now enjoying a long awaited 
trip to South America. At last her ambition 
for travelling has been realized. 

BIRKEMOSE. PAI L 

Paul is a valuable draftsman for the Navy. 
For his work he is making use of all his 
knowledge of Trigonometry. 

BLACKWELL, Ml'RIEL 

Muriel is now a nurse. She specializes in her 
smiles to win her patients back to health. 

BI AISDELL. FILMORE 

"Fill" has become president of a prominent 
chain of plumbing shops. Perhaps he's a mil- 
lionaire. Who knows:- 



BLAXCHARD, ALTOX 

"Al" is now singing waiter at the Hofbrau. 
He got his practice while singing to his cus- 
tomers at the First Xational Store. 

BOUDREAU, FLORENCE 

"Flossie" wears white, winter or summer, now. 
She is a nurse, and her cheery disposition wins 
many a patient back to health. 

BOURASSA, RALPH 

Ralph has written a book entitled "How to 
Study in Study Periods." Many students who, 
like Ralph, find it hard to concentrate, have 
benefited by it. 

BOWIE, RITA 

Rita is now a reporter, working for the Xew 
York Times. She had plenty of practice at the 
Junior High office. 

BRAYSHAW, JANET 

'Jan" has turned out to be quite a star at 
her favorite sport, tennis. What a "racket"! 

CACCARO, ANNA 

Anna has at last reached her goal. She's now 
first woman President of the United States. 

CALLOWAY, LOUISE 

Louise has now become a horse doctor. She 
is taking care of fillies. 

CAMERON, ELIZABETH 

"Bettv" is now "sitting pretty." She has mar- 
ried the boss's son. 

CAMPBELL, BRUCE 

Bruce is now head gardener for Vanderbilt. 
He is making use of all his practice received 
at Wevmouth High. 

CAREY, HELEN 

In Helen's position, thousands of dollars go 
through her hands every day. She is cashier 
at the Boston Co-operative Bank. 

CAVANAGH, CHARLES 

"Charlie" is now on the stage. With several 
of his old High School cronies, he is touring 
the country, playing, above all things, the 
cymbals. 

CHAPLIN, ALICE 

Rosie travels from city to city drawing the 
most fascinating people she sees. A real artist! 

CHAPMAN, CORA 

"Coke" has just returned from Europe where 
she has been entertaining the boys at the front 
with her all-girl band. 

CHEVERIE, BARBARA 

"Babs" is a "cute" little model in one of 
New York's most popular dress shops. We hear 
she's doing all right, too. 

CIPULLO, RALPH 

Ralph has become a very famous newspaper 
reporter for one of the world's largest organiza- 
tions. He has received several rewards for find- 
ing criminals. 



CIRIGLIANO, VIRGINIA 

'Ciggy" is a famous comedienne on the stage 
and in the movies. She has played on Broadway 
and is at present in Hollywood. 

CLANCY, JOHN 

John has become a successful writer for the 
comic strips. He obtained much of his training 
'from his days at Weymouth High. 

CLAPP, ELAINE 

Elaine has tapped her way to fame in her 
own state, and is now on her way to Holly- 
wood. 

CLARK, GEORGE 

George is now a chef for one of Boston's 
leading restaurants. He attributes his success 
to the practice he had at the Weymouth High 
cafeteria. 

CODY, ELIZABETH 

"Betty" has left the United States and is con- 
ducting tours through the countries of Europe. 

COLASANTI, BIAGGIO 

"Benny" is America's ace stunt driver. He 
received his practice running a taxi service for 
high-school students (ladies preferred.) 

COLEMAN, ROBERT 

"Bob" has become one of the country's fore- 
most chemical engineers. But, better than that, 
he is married to a very well-known screen act- 
ress. 

CONDRICK, DOROTHY 

Dorothy, after graduating from Bridgewater 
State Teachers' College, is now back at Wey- 
mouth High, teaching. She is popular with 
her pupils, because she remembers that she 
was once in their position. 

CONNOLLY. ROBERT 

"Bob" graduated from Bridgewater and is 
now teaching general science in the Junior 
High. 

CONSENTINO, JAMES 

"Coke" is now an ail-American full-back who 
continues to be a man about town. 

COOKE, AUDREY 

" Li 1 " Audrey is now a prominent business 
woman. She owns an exclusive dress shop on 
Fifth Avenue. 

CORCORAN, HELEN 

Helen is that girl whose voice you've been 
hearing over your phone. That's right, she 
is in the telephone office plugging in our num- 
bers. 

COREY, GEORGE 

George, having completed his pilot's course 
at Kellv Field, Texas, is now one of the Army's 
"crack" fliers. 

CORNELL, INEZ 

Inez is a secretary in Boston. We hear she's 
engaged to the boss. 

... 31 



COTE, LEONA 

"Lee" now employs a secretary to keep her 
social records. She always had a hard time 
keeping her dates straight. 

COUGHL1N, ROBERT 

"Bob" is now back at Weymouth High as a 
teacher of biology. He always did seem to en- 
joy biology classes when he was in high school. 

COURTNEY, MURIEL 

Muriel's quiet voice and good manners make 
her a good librarian. 

COWETT, LORRAINE 

"Rainy" can now be seen on the magazine 
covers from coast to coast. She photographs 
very nicely, too. 

COWING. CYNTHIA 

"Cyn" has reached her life long ambition. 
She is a successful doctor. 

COYLE, CATHERINI 

Catherine is now secretary to the manager of 
a large restaurant in Boston. Now she can 
have her light lunches whenever she pleases. 

COYLE, JAMES 

"Flash" is now a senior at Boston College, 
but is taking time out this year to enter the 
Olympics. 

CRONE, ESTHER 

Esther is back at good old Weymouth High. 
Have you noticed the menus they've been hav- 
ing lately? Esther is assistant dietitian. 

GROSSMAN, ARTHUR 

"Bud" is now a successful business m;m. And 
he still has someone taking notes for him. 

CULLIVAN, LAURENCE 

"Larry" is general manager of a store in 
Central Square. He stalled working hard while 
paying his class dues at Weymouth High. 

CURTIS. RICHARD 

Richard is now involved in the intricacies of 
mathematics, and is striving hard to solve the 
fourth dimension. 

DALY, JAMES 

"Jim" follows the rules to the letter in the 
administration of his own business. 

DALY, ELAINE 

Elaine is now her brother's private secretary 
in his flourishing business. 

DANIELS, VERA 

That voice you hear saying "Number puleez" 
when you make telephone calls is none other 
than Vera's. 

DARRIN, RITA 

Rita is now operating one of the leading 
gown shops in New York— Fifth Avenue, no 
less! 

DAVIS, PATRICIA 

"Pat" has become the "Glamour Girl" of the 
day. She has recently been starred in a very 
successful movie. 

32 . . . 



DAVISON, JUNE 

June is now a "lady in white." She delights 
in soothing the aching heads of her patients, 
especially the good-looking ones. 

DcCOSTE. HAROLD 

Harold, by continuous hard work and study 
after graduating from W. H. S., is now riving 
the mails to South America for Uncle Sam. 

DENNISON, l'RISCILLA 

Priscilla, who had such ability for writing 
poems during her years at W. H. S., has pub- 
lished her first volume. 

DESMOND, TIMOTHY 

"Speck" has won, after years of unceasing 
effort, the wrestling championship of the United 
States. 

DESMOND, WILLIAM 

"Bill" has created a comic strip for the "fun- 
nies." It is based upon his experiences in High 
School. look out, "L'il Abner." 

DeVOGEL, ANNA 

Anna leads a very exciting life. She's a news- 
paper reporter for the Boston Herald, and she's 
doing very well, too! 

DIZER, ELIZABETH 

"Betty" is now a leading dancing teacher in 
the town. She teaches every conceivable type 
of dancing, from the jitterbug to the ballet. 

DONAHUE, JOSEPH 

"Joe Blow'' has gone back to Hollywood! He 
is directing Donald Duck in his new picture, 
"Secret Agent, Quack!" 

DO! LE, VIRGIN] \ 

Virginia is now famous as the founder of the 
"Home for Orphans." Because of her kindness, 
she has started a home for stray animals. 

DUNCAN. EUGENE 

Soon after graduating. Gene moved back to 
his home town, Norwell, and is now making 
good in the accounting business. 

DUNN, CLAIRE 

Claire is now the proprietor of a beauty 
shop on Fifth Avenue. She has many patrons, 
owing to her "Sonny" disposition. 

DUNN, l'RISCILLA 

Priscilla is doing a "rushing business" as art- 
ist for hooks and magazines. If any of you 
write books and ever want your thoughts illus- 
trated, you will find Priscilla ready, willing, 
and able. 

1)1 RBECK, WINDSOR 

"Win" has just finished sailing round the 
world in his huge twelve-foot sloop. 

DWYER, JAMES 

"Jimmy" is doing big things now. He is a 
construction engineer and is building a bridge 
across the Atlantic. 

DWYER, MARY 

Mary is now handling all her father's secre- 
tarial work at the dairy. 



ELKINGTON, LAI R \ 

Laura is now head matron at Wellesle) Col- 
lege. She keeps "tabs" on all the girls to see 
that they obey all the rules. 

ELL ART), ELIZABETH 

Elizabeth went through Bridgewater with 
flving colors. She is now teaching others how 
to study and be successful. 

ELLIS, JEANE 

Jeane has achieved her ambition and now 
teaches a one-room school in the hills of Ken- 
tucky. She is very fond of her pupils, especially 
the handsome "L'il Abner." 

FARRAR. VERNON 

"Vern" is a promising salesman for a prom- 
inent npewriter manufacturer. He demon- 
strates the advantages of typing over writing 
very effectively. 

FAR R F.N. ERNEST 

"Ernie" raises prize cattle and poultry on 
his farm in New Hampshire. 

FAY. JOSEPH 

"Joe" has at last overcome his shortness. He 
is a stilt walker in a well-known circus com- 
pany. 

FIELDING, NANCY 

Nanc\'s artistic work in the Reflector brought 
her a position in Boston. She is now working 
on a Boston newspaper, drawing witty cartoons. 

FINN. PAULINE 

We find "Polh" with her partner, "Timmy" 
Desmond, touring the country. They have 
gained fame as impersonators of well-known 
Hollywood personalities, their specialty being 
"Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy." 

FISH. ELEANOR 

"El" is now a housewife and is comfortably 
settled in a vine-covered cottage in Springfield. 

FITZGERALD, ROSEMARY 

"Rose' is now recognized as an artist. She 
draws fashions for the Vogue Magazine. 

FOLEY. LOUISE 

Louise has recently been honored by receiving 
the title of "Massachusetts' Most Efficient Sec- 
retary." She attributes her success to her train- 
ing at Weymouth High. 

FOPIANO. WILLIAM 

"Willy's" building has won him great ac- 
claim. He collects junk in his spare time. 

FORD. ANNETTE 

"Chuggy" has become a very promising hair- 
dresser. However, she has anonunced that she 
is a career woman, and this stops many men 
from getting waves. 

FOR I IER. HELEN 

Helen is now the secretary to a successful 
boss. Wonder what became of her training in 
Latin? 



FRANCIS, DOROTHY 

"Dot" is now an aviatrix at "Ba\side." If 
anyone would like to go on a trip by airplane, 
he'll find "Dot" willing and able to make the 
trip more enjoyable. 

FREDRICKSON, MARION 

Marion is now a nurse in a Lynn hospital. 
She is at her best when arranging her patients 
rose "buds." 

FRIMANSON, MILDRED 

"Millie" is still an efficient stenographer and 
has recently entered one of the prosperous firms 
of Chicago, as private secretary to the vice-presi- 
dent. 

FUCCI, JOHN 

John is now a famous magician. At present 
he is touring in Europe. He got his start by 
doing tricks at W. H. S. It is said that he is 
extremely clever. 

FULLER, HELEN 

Helen is an efficient secretary in the Bur- 
roughs Adding Machine office. She intends to 
work up to the position of chief executive. 

GADD, ALBERT 

"Al" is now chief milk-tester at one of the 
well-known milk companies. 

GAINEY, ELIZABETH 

Elizabeth has achieved her ambition and 
become a private secretary. She attributes her 
success to her training at W. H. S. 

GALLANT, JOSEPH 

"Joe" is stock taker at a type eraser factory. 
He always has a supply of erasers on hand 
now. 

GARRJTY, WILLIAM 

"Bill" is now a government inspector, and is 
hauling in the big "dough." His job is to see 
that the mails go through. 

GATELY, ROBERT 

Robert is now manager of an exclusive cloth 
ing store in New York, where he sells the 
latest styles in men's clothes. 

GATTO, MARIO 

"Mo" is now instructor at his own physical 
education school, and is teaching boys the same 
school spirit that he showed as the captain of 
his high school football team. 

GELINAS, RALPH 

Ralph has just been admitted to the bar. 
They tell us that he will be one of our most 
prominent lawyers some day. 

GENCHAUSKI, HELEN 

Helen is now the treasurer of the South 
Shore Trust Company. She alwa\s was good at 
keeping records of class dues. 

GIBSON. BARRY 

Barry has become a first class trumpet player 
in one of America's best known classical orches- 
tras. He got his ambition, we understand, from 
the music class in W. H. S. 



33 



GFI. LIS, CATHERINF. 

"Catty" is considered l>y her friends to have 
made a great success of her lite. She married 
the hoss's son. 

GILLIS, Rl 111 

'Gil" has donned her kill, tucked her hag- 
pipe under her arm, and headed for Glasgow. 
She has swept from triumph to triumph on 
the musical comedy stage, being especially 
famous for her stirring rendition of "Just a 
Wee Doth an' Doris." 

GLADWIN, CURTISS 

"Curt" has won international lame as a spel- 
ler, and is now a rccogni/ed authority on or- 
thography. 

t.l.os I ER, ROBERT 

"Red" is a travelling salesman. And just 
like the "Red" of old, he has a customer at 
every stop. 

GRANT, MER TON 

Merton rides about in a beach wagon, selling 
his fruit and vegetables, fit- Mailed OUI with 
this trade little knowing what a success of it 
he would make. 

GRIFFIN, ALU I 

Alice is now a clerk in a variety store. She 
never did like being lied down to one thing. 

GRIFFIN, BARBARA 

Barbara is working as an analyst in a hos- 
pital lor sick insects. 

GUNN, JOHN 

John is now one of the populai novelists <>l 
the day. He started out l>\ contributing to the 
Reflector. 

HACKETT, ROSEMARY 

"Rose" has become one of Dale Carnegie's 
ablest assistants. Because e4 her own success. 
Mr. Carnegie hired Rose to tell others "Hou- 
To Win Friends and Influence People." 

HANABURY, MARIAN 

"Dida" has opened a school in New York lot 
all voting, inexperienced jitterbugs. 

HAYNES. BETH 

Beth is now writing a book entitled "School 
Days Are the Best Days." 

HEINS 1 ROM. EDWARD 

"Eddie" is one of Maine's top guides, thanks 
to his forestry experience in W. H. S. .i-H for- 
estry department. 

HICKEY, WILLIAM 

"Bill" is reaping in the "dough" from his 
hundred-acre farm. 

HOLBROOK, LOIS 

Lois is now captain of a scout troop in South 
America. She always was a good scout. 

HOLBROOK, LORRAINE 

Lorraine is doing secretarial work in a bus- 
iness office, in East Bridgewater. 



HOLLAND, ETHEL 

Ethel was reccnth graduated from the New 
England Conservator] ol Music. She is now 
one of the best known conceit pianists in the' 
state. 

HOPKINS, 1 1 1 

Lee is now one of the country's leading or- 
chestra leaders. His orchestra has taken the 
place of Wayne Kind's and has received even 
wider recognition. 

HORN, MARJORIE 

"Marjie" is busy giving permanent waves and 
polishing linger nails in a leading beauty shop. 

HOI 1)1 . VLMA 

Alma is now a nurse employed at the Wev - 
mouth Hospital, where she can keep an account 
of her school friends. 

HOUSE, PAULINE 

Taulic" is now a full-Hedged nurse and is 
supervisor of a convalescent home for All- 
American athletes. 

HUNT, RITA 

Rita spends most of the lime- rejoicing over 
her evenings free from homework. Hon Rita 
haled 10 study at night! 

JANNELL, MANNING 

The Ford Motor Company is opening a new 
construction plant in Quincy under the able 
direction of our Manning. Now watch the 
Lords go by! 

[OHNSON, BARBAR \ 

Barl>ara has touched all the high spots in 
her life and now has settled down lo manage 
a tea room. 

JOHNSON, EILEEN 

Eileen is back at Wev mouth High teac hing, 
of all things, Latin. She gained renown while 
in high school for her work in the 217 Latin 
club. 

JORDAN. RICHARD 

"Dick", after much persuasion and exhorta- 
tion, has turned out to be just what we thought 
he would— a Latin teacher! 

KAI, VIRGINIA 

"Ginnie" is now a companion 10 a wealthy 
woman. At present they arc traveling through 
Europe. 

KARAIN, ALICE 

Alice is a governess of a well to-do family 
in the Back Bay. 

KKBLIS, JOSEPHINE 

"Keby" can now be found at the First Na- 
tional Bank in Boston, where she is treasurer. 
She got her experience at Weymouth High. 

KEEFE, PAUL 

Paul has the enviable position of coach of 
the 'Rockettes" at Radio City Music Hall. 



34 



KELLEY. JAMES 

James is now manager of a hardware store 
in Weymouth Landing. He has gradually been 
working up lo the position since his High 
School days, when he started as an errand boy. 

KELLEY, MARIE 

Marie is now a Latin teacher. Besides her 
books, Marie is supplied with a megaphone for 
her pupils' benefit. 

KELLEY, FRANCIS 

Francis's ingenious mind has at last made 
irself known. He has invented a mechanical 
hair brush. 

KELLY. THOMAS 

"Tom's'' interest in baseball has won him a 
responsible position. He is now the coach of 
the Boston Bees. 

KINCAID, DORIS 

Doris is now a secretary in a large concern 
in Dorchester, a great convenience for her. 

KINSLEY, AGNES 

After finishing High School, Agnes took a 
post-graduate course. \She then passed the 
civil service examination on secretarial work, 
and is now one of Boston's most successful sec- 
retaries. 

KOSARICK. NATALIE 

Watch out, folks! "Nat" is devolping her 
own pictures now; so keep out of her way. 

LAMBE. JOSEPH 

Joe" is trying hard to win the Amateur Golf 
Championship. Yesterday he shot a 70 at Bel- 
mont. Wonder what he'll get on the second 
nine? 

LAMBRF.CHT, OLIYE 

Olive who has a private plane, is a stunt 
(her. If you wish to charter a plane for a 
pleasure trip, just look up Olive. 

LANG. CATHERINE 

Catherine is making good use of the experi- 
ence in cooking she received at W. H. S. She's 
dietitian at the Massachusetts General Hospital. 

LANG. JENNIE 

Jennie is the proprietor of a gown shop which 
is popular among the ladies of the smart set. 

LaPOINTE. HAROLD 

Harold, a man of few words, has recently 
written a book entitled "Why People Talk So 
Much." 

LARAMIE, EVELYN 

Evelyn is famous in Paris, France. She's a 
designer of women's hats. 

LaROCCO. VICTORIA 

"Vicky" has been a stenographer until re- 
cently. She obeyed a sudden impulse and eloped 
with her boss. 

LaROSSA. AI.PHONSE 

"Al" invented a perpetual motion machine, 
made a fortune from it, bought a very famous 
rundown baseball team, put them on their 
feet, and is now touring the country with them. 



LEARY, ANNA 

Anna has recently written a book which she 
tails "How to Study and Wh) I Didn't." It 
should be a great success. 

LESTER, MIRIAM 

Miriam is now in New York. She models ex- 
clusive hats from France. 

LEWIS, ANNE MARIE 

Anne Marie has attained her most cherished 
hope, that of private secretary to a well-known 
business executive. 

LILLA, PETER 

"Pete" is a great musician in a famous or- 
chestra. He certainly "goes to town" when it 
comes to "Jazz." 

LITCHFIELD, LILLIAN 

Lillian is now taking pictures in Hollvwood 
She gets "candid shots" of the stars. 

LITCHFIELD, RITA 

Rita is very contented now, working as a 
stenographer in Hull. She still doesn't like sten- 
ography, so it must be Hull. 

LOHNES, ELIZABETH 

"Betty" the lover of horseflesh, has become 
president of the Massachusetts Riding Associa- 
tion and has established a home for the care of 
aged and indigent race horses. 

LONG, HELEN 

Helen is still efficient as under-secretary to 
the Secretary of State, in Washington. 

LORING, KENNETH 

"Ken" decided to put his extensive high 
school experience to use; he became a clown 
under the big top with the Ringling Brothers- 
Barnum and Bailey Circus. 

LOUD. GRACE 

Grace has gathered together a band com- 
posed for graduates from the W. H. S. band. 
She also has time for doing expert photo- 
graphic work, studying the more difficult as- 
pects of astronomy, and playing a masterly 
game of chess. 

LYONS. THOMAS 

"Tommy" is playing for the Boston Bruins 
now. He is showing the old fight in every 
game. 

MACAFEE, JEAN 

Jean is now in business with one of our 
leading concerns. She is secretary to "royalty." 

Mat ARTHUR. ROBERT 

"Bob" manages a professional football team, 
besides writing articles entitled "What the 
Best Dressed Man Is Wearing." 

MacDONALD, DOUGLASS 

After studying in Paris for several vears, 
"Doc" has become a teacher of French at Har- 
ard. We remember the lovelv French accent 
he had at W. H. S. 



MacLEOD, CHARLOTTE 

Charlotte is now a noted professor. She 
leaches every conceivable language and is said 
to he the only person able to repeat the French 
alphabet backwards, as well as forward. 

Mac \U I T. CHARLES 

"Mac" has his picture hung in the Hall ol 
Fame as the "Typical New England Boy." 

MANN. STANLEY 

" Stan" has put in a claim to the- LoVell Bus 
Lines. He objects to bending over in the buses. 

MARIANI, GRACE 

Grace is thing high. She's an air hostess on 
the Yankee Clipper. 

\\ \RSHM AN. W ILLIAM 

"Bill" has achieved his pet ambition. He is 
tearing up text hooks for The E. E. Babb Co. 
to determine their wearing qualities. He sa\s 
l ha l he- learned his trade in the W. H. S. book- 
room. 

M \ I HEWSON, RI TH 

Km h has become secretary to the pxesidenl 
ol .1 huge steamship line. She has jusi returned 
from .1 world cruise. 

McCarthy, francis 

"Frannie" is now a member ol a professional 
basketball team. His pieture is often seen on 
the spoils pages of out hest-known newspapers. 

McCAR 1 m . PAUL 

Paul has become a gentleman farmer and a 
successful one. We have learned from an au- 
thoritative source that he also grows his own 
tobacco. 

McCUE, MIRIAM 

There has keen such a demand lor Miriam's 
famous giggle that she is now giving a course 
entitled "The Art of Giggling." 

McDonald, james 

"Jim" has Weymouth's oil business cornered. 
He always was one who hated to have anyone 
get ahead of him. 

McGAW. ELK A NOR 

Eleanor is now a beautician at the Ril/ salon, 
on l ilih Avenue, in New York. 

McGLYNN, MARY 

Mar) is now a private secretary to the presi- 
dent of the Walk-Quiet Carpet Company ol 
Maine. She advertises his thick rugs, which 
sol ten the sounds of footsteps, because she is 
so epiict herself. 

Mc ISAAC. WALLACE 

"Mac" has a thriving business washing tais 
along the South Shore. He started as a senior 
in high school and worked up. 

McNEIL, EDWARD 

''Eddie" is up in the air. He's a trapeze 
artist, and a very good one, according to the 
latest reports. 

36... 



MEHRMAN, (I LIA 

"Judy" is now a very efficient secretary to the 
president ol a trucking concern in Boston. Very 
convenient ! 

MERCURIC JOSEPH 

Nelson Eddy's place has been annexed by om 
own "Joe" Mercuric We wish you luck, "Joe." 

Ml I (Mil. BE I I '» 

Betty, with her acordion, has won her way 
to fame and is now the leader of an all-girl 
orchestra in New York Cit\. 

Ml 1 CALF. F.II/AB1 I H 

"Betty" has "cookied" hersell quite .1 spot in 
the list ol well-known epicures. She's certainly 
keen competition for a well-known restaurant. 

Mil 1 I K. I)()K() 1 111 

"Dot" has become famous as the maker of 
"Dot's Delicious Doughnuts." Her motto is 
"Even the holes taste good". 

MILLER, III I.F.N 

He len is now a travelling saleswoman. With 
hei sparkling personality, she can't help being 
sin cessful. 

MONROE, ROBER I 

"Monnie" has been rising rapidly in the 
spoils world as a professional hockey player. 
Nothing can get In him .11 his defence position. 

MORRISON |1 \\ 

'Jeannie" is our idea of a girl who made 
gocid. She went to Hollywood and has reached 
the lop at M-G-M. She married the boss's son. 

MORSE, W il l I \M 

"Bill is now .1 dancing teacher. Ih teaches 
ihc- I hue Musketeers specially sieps. 

Ml LLEN, \LBI R I 

"\lhy" can now he found somewhere in the 
South Pole. He has joined Admiral By id. 

Ml I I I \ ROBER I 

'Moonie" has taken oyer the position as man- 
ager ol the Quinq Market. This position has 
made "Moonie" one ol the tnosl prominent 
business men in this yieiniiy. 

Ml LLEN, SUMNER 

"Sum" is now "head" chemist at Harvard. 
He specializes in the manufacture ol a new 
kind ol explosive. Here's hoping Harvard siill 
stands when "Sum" has finished. 

MULLIGAN, |OHN 

"Moose ", alter dabbling a little in pro' loot- 
hall. has become one of the "big shots" in the 
Weymouth Light and Power Company. 

Ml RLI V. 1) w in 

"Dave" has become one ol the best and high- 
est paid pitchers on the Red Sox. They cer- 
tainly needed him. 

MURPHY, JOSEPH 

"Pat" is in a maze of test tubes and such. Hy- 
ing to manufacture a non-intoxicating liquor. 



MURPHY, MARY 

Mar) is touring the country, giving lectures 
on "Old Kilarney." 

MYLES, BETTE 

Bette is the answer to the stout woman's 
dream. She is an authority on how to reduce 
without exercising. 

NASH. ANNA 

Anna is now the leader of the Girl Scouts of 
America. She is respected and loved by every 
girl in America because of the wonderful work 
she has done for them. 

NELSON. CONSTANCE 

"Connie" is now a very successful radio per- 
sonality. The title of her programme is "How 
To Cain Weight Quickly." 

NESS. NANCY 

Nancy has learned how to fly, and she and 
her partner go around the country barnstorm- 
ing. Look out below! 

NESSON. MORTON 

Morton, the chicken fancier, now owns a large 
poultry farm in the wilds of South Weymouth. 

NEWCOMB. CHARLES 

"Charlie" now owns the largest poultry busi- 
ness in the state. The success of this business 
has made it possible for him to fulfill his one 
ambition— to travel round the world. 

NI WCOMB, HAROLD 

"Teen" is now employed as a bookkeeper in 
a well-known factory. His years at Weymouth 
High taught him his profession. 

NEWCOMB, JUNE 

June is now a secretary. She received her 
training bv keeping the accounts of class dues 
in order. 

NOCERA. ELEANOR 

Eleanor now chews her gum in time to a 
typewriter at a noted gum factory. She finds 
it both a convenience -and a saving. 

O'BRIEN. EDWARD 

"Eddie" is now an office bov in a large con- 
cern. He got his experience cleaning the mim- 
eograph in the office-practice room. 

O'CONNOR, MARGARET 

"Miggie" is enjoving the fulfillment of her 
greatest ambition. She is one of those pleasant- 
voiced operators who "Ken" solve your tele- 
phone difficulties. 

O'LEARY, EDWARD 

"Ed" now manages the Red Star Hockey 
Team. He is getting excellent results. 

O'LEARY. ELEANOR 

Eleanoi has changed places with Eleanor 
Powell in the dancing world. She and Fred 
Astaire, her dancing partner, are taking the 
country by storm. 

OLIVE, ROBERT 

"Bob' is a famous concert pianist. He spends 
his spare time playing ping-pong. 



PAGE, DOROTHY 

"Dot" is now a dental nurse, whose specialty 
is pulling teeth. You will find hei ver) oblig- 
ing. 

PANORA, CATHERINE 

"Pinky" is now in Hollywood. She has taken 
Perc Westmore's place as beautician. 

PARSONS, ESTELLE 

Estelle is now making good as secretary to 
Waltei Bakei and Company. The) say that 
the compan) has been profiting greatly since 
Fstelle began work there. 

PARSONS. SELINA 

Selina is wearing out the mechanism of her 
right e\e from winking so much. 

PEARCE, [AMES 

"Jim'' is a regular Sherlock Holmes. He is 
writing detective stories for local papers. 

PECORARO, MARIE 

Marie can now be found mingling with the 
stars in Holhwood. She is a script girl. 

PETERS. RALPH 

Ralph has just been hired b\ the Jello Gom- 
pan) to take the place of Jack Benin, who will 
soon retire. 

I'l l I EE, LOIS 

Lois now runs a matrimonial agency. Her 
lady customers, like the Mounties, always get 
their man. 

PFLAUMER, JOHN 

John, who was determined to rise in the 
world, is now an indoor aviator. He runs an 
elevator. 

I' 1 CARD, PRISCILLA 

"Piissv" is now a torch singer at the "Heigh- 
de-Ho" Club in Florida. 

PIKE. DORIS 

"Dot" is successful in an unusual occupation. 
She is i nulling a boarding house. 

PIZZI, ROSE MARIE 

Rose has established a residence in Reno. 
She is a court stenographer. 

PLUMMER, EVELYN 

Because ol Evelyn's skating ability, she has 
now joined Sonja Henie's Ice Troupe. We heat 
that she is reallv burning up the ice. 

POMARICO, PRUDENCE 

Prudence is a lady of leisure. She is receiv- 
ing royalties on her latest novel. "The Ait ol 
Italy's Heritage." 

PORTER, GLORIA 

"Glo" has stepped into Eddie Duchin's shoes. 
Her clever stvle of piano playing has won her 
wide recognition. 

RALPH. KENNETH 

When that skier ptdls his head out ol the 
snowdrift that so thoughtless!) got in his way, 
you'll find it's out own "champ," "Kennie." 

• • • 37 



RAYMOND, GLADYS 

"Gladdie" has been seeking her fortune in 
Hollywood. From all appearances, she has more 
than found it. 

RICHARDS, FLORENCE 

Florence is now one of the leading nurses at 
Boston Memorial Hospital. She is making good 
use of all the Latin-she learned at W. H. S. 

RIEKER, JOAN 

foan has become a photographer's model. 
Her pretty face is frequently seen on billboards 
and magazine covers. 

ROBERTS, WALTER 

Who would have thought that Waltei would 
be a teacher of languages? He is, and the} s.i\ 
he is a "wiz" at French. 

ROWELL, EDITH 

Edith has joined one of the young people's 
walking tours, and is now Inking X-miles per 
hour across country. Where is she? Anywhere 
between Schenectady and Timbuctoo. 

ROWELL, MARJORIE 

"Marjie" is an efficient secretary now. Her 
speed in dictation comes from practice given 
by a well-known educator. 

RUDOLPH, DORIS 

Doris is a clerk with the Jordan Marsh Com- 
pany. She sells engagement rings at the jeweln 
counter. 

RUEL, MARJORIE 

"Margie's" dancing has brought her much 
praise. Recently she won a contest as the besl 
jitterbug in South Weymouth. 

RUGMAN, GEORGE 

George is now a taxi cab driver. His business 
seems to be centered in South Weymouth. 

SAMPSON, ALAN 

While he was at Tufts, Alan won football 
honors as Ail-American tackle; and upon com- 
pletion of his studies, he entered the field of 
radio. He is now a famous sports comentator. 

SANTRY, RUTH 

"Ruthie" is now teaching Latin at Weymouth 
High. Everyone likes her because she remem- 
bers the days when she was nervous over un- 
prepared lessons. 

SAVERY, PAUL 

Paul has become a contortionist. He often 
appears at Quincy Arena. 

SCULLY, JAMES 

"Jimmie" has finally taken the teachers' ad- 
vice to raise his voice when speaking. He's 
now a famous soap box orator on Boston Com- 
mon. 

SHAW, FLORENCE 

"Flossie" now owns a large dress factory and 
supplies Hollywood's actresses. She started jut 
as an assistant buyer in a small concern. 

38... 



SHEEHY, MARY ROSE 

Mary is now a nurse in a small hospital in 
Swamscott. She "bobs'' around from one room 
to another, spreading good cheer. 

SHERMAN, MOSES 

"Moe" is a track star on the United States 
Olvmpic team. He owes his success to his train- 
ing at Weymouth High. 

SILVA, MERLE 

MERLE is now traveling about the country, 
favoring everyone with his alto horn. 

SLANEY. EILEEN 

Eileen is now abiding in a quaint Cape Cod 
toll age. Her summer vacations on the Cape 
acquainted her with its loveliness. 

SI VI TERY, EILEEN 

"Slats" is s,t ill in Wcv mouth High. She is 
private secretary to Mr. Lyons. 

SI \ I I ERY, FRED! R.K K 

"Fred," since his brilliant football days at 
W. H. S., has been keeping limber behind a 
sports writer's desk. 

SMITH, CHARLOTTE 

Charlotte is now a Latin teacher, teaching at 
W. H. S. Her training at Weymouth High cer- 
tainly was profitable. 

SMITH, PAUL 

Five days after graduating, "Smitty" inher- 
ited a Fabulous fortune, and since then has been 
taking it easy. He is now a member of the 
South Shore Country Club. 

STANLEY, BARBARA 

Barbara is now a radio broadcaster on sta- 
tion WEEI. She can at last talk to her heart's 
content. Many American housewives listen to 
her even' morning as she advertises household 
equipment. 

STANTON, PORTIA 

Portia has become a member of the Metro- 
politan Opera Company. She dusts the furni- 
ture after each performance. 

S I AR RA I T, LOUISE 

Louise is travelling 011 the high seas. She 
was reccntlv appointed ambassadress to Eng- 
land. 

STEELE, MURIEL 

Muriel is back at W. H. S. She is trying to 
train her typewriting pupils to gain the speed 
that she has attained. 

SULLIVAN, DOROTHY 

Parisian hair stylists will find that they have 
a pretty close competitor from America, in the 
person of "Dot." 

SULLIVAN, MARY 

Mary has succeeded in matrimony. Her hus- 
band owns a pineapple plantation in Hawaii. 

SULLIVAN, PATRICIA 

"Pat's" address, now, is Hollywood. She is 
a famous motion picture actress. 



SVBERTS. DOLORES 

"Dozie" is now a "Woman in White." If her 
patients aren't in a cheerful mood, she recites 
some original poetry for them. 

TACCONELLI, LEA 

Who would have thought that Lea would 
become a cowgirl? Nevertheless, she owns a 
ranch in Nevada, where she raises fine cattle 
and giant pandas. 

TETEZIAN, SADIE 

Sadie has achieved her life-long ambition. 
She is teaching the eighth grade at the Hunt 
School. 

THIBEAULT, ROBERT 

"Red" now owns one of the largest hotels in 
New York City. He inherited it from a distant 
relative. 

THOMAS, HELEN 

Helen is now a singer for the Metropolitan 
Opera Company. She is one of the keenest 
rivals of Helen Jepson. 

THOMPSON. ALFRED 

"Al" is teaching at the Bridgewater State 
Normal School. His subject is "What to Study 
and How to Study." 

THOMPSON, JESSIE 

Jessie has decided to devote her young life 
to the government. She cooks for the C. C. C. 
boys. 

TILDEN, DONALD 

"Tilly" has achieved his desire to be the 
driver of a fire truck. With him at the wheel, 
what chance has the fire? 

TITUS, WINIFRED 

"Winnie" is the popular little blues singer 
heard with Artie Shaw's orchestra. 

TORRESSEN, DOROTHY 

"Dot" at last is able to indulge in her love 
for speed. She has entered the international 
midget racing championship for women. 

TOTMAN, RICHARD 

"Tot" is now working for a large broadcast- 
ing system. He is doing imitations on the "Kid- 
die Hour." 

TRUSSELL, FRIEDA 

Frieda is now a stenographer in the office of 
the Metropolitan Insurance Company at Bos- 
ton. 

TUCCI, JOSEPH 

"Joe" is now an all-American guard, and he 
is distinguishing himself as an amateur 
wrestler. 

TURNER, RITA 

"Penny" has found herself head of a cor- 
poration, counting "nichols" for the rest of 
her days. 

VARTANIAN, CHRISTINE 

"Chris" has purchased a large farm aiid in- 
tends to make flowers her specialty, although 
she is definitely opposed to bugs. 



VAUGHAN, JOHN 

"Jack" is now successfully promoting wrestling 
exhibition matches at the Quincy Arena. 

VOIGT, CARL 

Carl is part owner of a huge wheat farm in 
Minnesota. He is using the knowledge he got 
at Weymouth Agricultural School. 

WADDELL, CONSTANCE 

"Connie" is at last living in her dreamland 
of Hawaii. She's working at the tourists' bu- 
reau of the Matson Steamship Lines, where she 
lectures daily on the beauties of the Islands. 

WALLACE, VIRGINIA 

Virginia, after completing her studies at Jack- 
son, is now an Associate with Dale Carnegie as 
a lecturer in his personality course, " How To 
Make Friends". 

WATSON, WESLEY 

"Wes" bought himself a submarine for the 
purpose of studying "Fish" in their native 
habitat. He is fast becoming famous as an un- 
derwater scientist, besides enjoying a carefree 
life on (or under) the rolling waves. 

WEBBER, FLORENCE 

In college, Florence developed a great interest 
in botany, and now she roams the jungles of 
South America looking for rare orchids. 

WHEELER, FREDERICK 

"Chick" has become a great lover of classical 
music. He has recently become the new direc- 
tor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

WHITE, GERTRUDE 

"Gert" now holds hands and soothes brows. 
She's head nurse in a hospital for injured foot- 
ball players. 

WILKINSON, GEORGE 

George has taken up a profession which suits 
him very well. He drives a racer. 

WILLIS, NAOMI 

Naomi is now a nurse taking care of those 
unfortunate persons who end up in the hos- 
pital. 

WOOD, KENNETH 

"Kennie" is the star wrestler at the Madison 
Square Garden. We have it on good authority 
that his famous bear hug originated in the 
W. H. S. Gym. 

WOODWORTH, MARY 

Mary has turned out to be the world's most 
practical joker. She got her practice in 304. 

WRIG.HT, HAROLD 

Harold is head chemist at Harvard. With 
"H." on the job what chance has chemistry? 

YETMAN, ELLIOTT 

Elliott is manager of the Bruins. He gained 
his experience by chasing pucks down Mill 
Pond. 

ZEMINA, GEORGE 

George is now in partnership with Arthur 
Murray. Howevei, it is said that he will soon 
start his own class. 



39 



Trade School Prophecy 



AUTO REPAIR 

BOWLES, RALPH 

"Ralphie" is now an experienced automobile 
painter, and is doing some sign painting on the 
side. 

DILL. EL WOOD 

'Tickle" has bought out the bowling alleys 
at the Landing and has converted them into a 
Ford agency. 

FADER, JAMES 

"Jim" now owns the biggesl little repah 
shop in Abington. 

LeMOTTE, PETER 

"Pete" has just returned from Monte Carlo, 
and is planning to bu) a suing of rate horses 
with his winnings. 

NAUHAi EVERETT 

"Every" has the biggest chicken farm in New 
England. He is also kept bus) pressing cider. 

PEASLEE, LEONARD 

"Lenny" is now the proprietor of a "Gofkauf" 
store, and is surrounded l)\ auto accessories. 

RUBBO, SEBASTIAN 

When you take your car to the Weymouth 
Trade School garage, you will gel a pleasant 
greeting from instructor "Sahby." 

SMITH, OLIVER 

"Smithy" is now the sole proprietoi of the 
"Elite Escort Service" for young ladies. 

THURSTON, HAROLD 

"Thursty" has taken over his Uncle's ice 
business, and is doing a good job ol i tinning it. 

VIRTA, OLIVER 

"Gits" now runs the best laundn on the 
South Shore. His motto is "No checkee, no 
shirtee." 

WRIGHT, ARTHUR 

"Art" is now a star mechanic for the Terra- 
plane Company, having received his experience 
from his "pofo" car. 



CABINET MAKING 

JACOBS, VICTOR 

"|ake" is now in business for himself. He is 
busily boring worm holes in Antique furniture. 

JASMIN, ROLAND 

"Roily" is a victim of the nut house; he is 
making nuts and holts 

LOVENDALE, CARL 

"Johnny"' is now a dirt farmer, just to keep 
near Mother Earth. 



PRINTING 

BARRETT, (AMIS 

",nn always wanted to be mayot ol Braintree, 
until someone (tossed him and elected him 
President ol the United Stales. 

CONSI N I [NO, DOMINIC 

"Coke" wanted to i>e with his brother; so 
he joined the Navy. Within two weeks he was 
made Reai Admiral ol the Fleet. 

GARRITY, EUGENE 

"Skipper's" ambition was to be captain on 
some ocean liner. He is now captain ol the 
fleet at the "Red Mill," Nantasket Beach. 

HAY, GARLAND 

"Gar" is now head chemist at George H. 
Morrill Ink Company. He got his experience 
h\ mixing colored water when at school. 

LINEHAN, GEORGE 

Red ' uas a printer until Offset came into 
use. Now he is demonstrating how to control 
coffee nerves. 

M.i' DONALD, JOHN 

"Mac " wanted to be a Michle vertical op- 
erator. Instead he works in an assembly plain 
putting counter. 

McNAMARA, KENNETH 

"Ken" fooled them all. He took up printing, 
and is actually working at it on the stall of the 
New York Times. 

OLSON, PAUL 

"String " who was the tallest boj in school, is 
wot king in a lack laclorv, packing up tacks. 

OSTLUND, HOMER 

"Homer" lias given up printing. He is now 
teaching the boys of the T rade School how to 
stomp. 

SAVORY, RUSSELL 

"Russ." armed with a sling shot and twelve- 
point type, is hunting polar bears oil the Cape 
ol (.nod Hope. 

SCIACCA, JOSEPH 

"Joe," when he was in school, won honorable 
mention twice in essays. Now he has written a 
book entitled "How to Do It." 

SKEFFINGTON, LEO 

"Skiff" is an inspectoi in a mattress factory. 
His job is to see if the mattresses are comfort- 
able b\ sleeping on them. He wants to cptit, 
because there is too much woik. 

TASSINARY, ROBERT 

"Tass." the famous dancer, makes his own 
shoes in his own shop for a side line. 



.JO 



SHEET METAL 



B U LIS. W ILLIAM 

"Bill " is back ;ii the Vocational School teach- 
ing Social Aits. He obtained his degree in Social 
vi s a: Harvard. 



( V\ VLLO, (.LIDO 

Guido has been selected for the Ail-American 
Football team, and will pla\ in the East-West 
_, ime on New Year's Day. 

DiGRAVIO, RICO 

Rico, a good and ambitious soldier, has just 
been promoted to Captain in the National 
Guard. 



DUFFNEY, GEORGE 

George, formerly a paper hoy, has now started 
his own paper. We hear that he is making a 
great success of it. 



FRAILS, JOHN 

"Porky" has recently been appointed Vmei 
ican Ambassadoi to China. 

HI rCHINSON, I. i s I ER 

Lester is the sole ownei <>l a sheel metal shop 
on the Devil's Island. He is making tin cups 
and pi. iics for the pi isoners. 

VI WW l.LL, HOWARD 

"Mac" has just taken over the Maxwell House 
Coffee Plant. He has recently perfected a new 
blend ol coffee which has readily been accepted 
by housewives as superior to all others. 

NORWOOD. GEORGE 

"Burn 'em up Norwood" has just broken all 
speed records at the Indianapolis speedway. 

SHEPPARD, GERALD 

Gerald's future has been decided definitely by 
,1 woman in South Weymouth. 

SHERMAN. JOHN 

John, an ambitious worker at all times, is 
now trying to sell oilburners to the Eskimos. 



Class Census 



Most Popular Girl 


Virginia Doyle 


Most Popular Fellow 


Fred Slattery 


Wittiest 


Wendell Totman 


Prettiest Girl 


Pauline House 


Class Shiek 


Fillmore Blaisdell 


Class Comedian 


Ralph Peters 


Class Bookworm 


Alfred Thompson 


Class Musician 


Robert Olive 


Class Baby 


Alton Blanchard 


Class Actor 


Charles Cavanagh 


Class Artist 


Nancy Fielding 


Class Heartbreaker 


Kenneth Ralph 


Most Dependable 


Virginia Wallace 


Most Carefree 


Anna Leary 


Best Dressed Girl 


Cynthia Cowing 


Best Dressed Fellow 


Robert MacArthur 


Most Popular with the Ladies 


George Andersen 


Most Popular with the Men 


Pauline House 



BARBARA L. AMBACH 

"Barb" 

East Wevmouth Classical Course 

Junior Decorating Committee 3: Book Club \: 
Volleyball 4: Chess Club 1. 

A friend and pal so goad and true, 
'Tis hard to find another like you. 

GEORGE ANDERSEN 

"Gump" 

South Wevmouth General Course 

Junior Nominating Committee 3: Senioi 
Dance Committee Chairman 4; Baseball 3, 4; 
Football 1, 3. 4: Track 4. 

A truly great athlete. 

CYRIL O. ANDERSON 

"Andy" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
North Quincy High School 1, 2. 3; Sports Club 1. 
2: Varsit) baseball to/am 2. 3; Lunchroom Duty 
1, 2. 

IV e think "Cid" is a sure bet, 

Because we know he will surprise us yet. 

MARGARET ANDERSON 

"Peg" 

Fast Weymouth Business Course 

Basketball 2: Volleyball 2; Gregg Transcrip- 
tion Certificate for 80 words a minute 4: Ush- 
er at Senior l'Ia\ \. 

Very fond of sports and fun, 
And all of our hearts has iron. 

MARILYN ANDERSON 
South Weymouth Business Course 
French Club 3: Glee Club 1; Junior Nominat- 
ing Committee 3; Who's Who Committee 4; 
Gym Exhibition 1; Operetta 1; Usher at Oper- 
etta 4; Gregg Shorthand Theor) Certificate: 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for Ho words a 
minute: Gregg Transcription Certificate for 100 
words a minute. 

./ maid who is neat 

And rather petite. 

JOHN L. ANDERSSON 

"Andy" 

North Weymouth Technical Couisc 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1. 

Deeper, deeper, lei us toil 
In the mines of knowledge. 

RALPH ANTONETT1 

"Ralphy" 

Fast Weymouth Business Course 

Class Nominating Committee \: Football 3, 4; 
Golf 2. 3. ,. 

./ good sport in eiiery thing he docs. 



DOROTHY ARSENAULT 

"Dot" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Glee Club 1; Basketball 1; Gregg Shorthand 
rheor) Certificate 3: Class Outing Committee 
I- 

Dot is full of laughter and ivit; 
Willi this she always makes a hit. 



MARY E. AUSTIN 

"Mimie" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Glee Club 1. 

With her cheerful smile and merry ways, 
She helps us j>ass many happy days. 



RALPH W. AUSTIN 

"Skipper" 

South Weymouth Agricultural Course 
How to learn history 
To me is a mystery. 



RAYMOND L. BADGER 

"Ray" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Class Dues Collector 3. 4: Cross Country 1: 
Football 2. 3. 1: Wrestling 1, Track 1, 2: Gym 
Exhibition 1. 2, 3: Class Outing Committee \. 
We arc sure he will never sit, 
W hen there is any time fot wit. 



MARY H. BANKS 
"Mary, Jr." 
North Weymouth Classical Course 
Book Club \: Junior Part) Committee 3. 
A great big smile, a heart full of fun. 
A loyal friend to everyone. 



DORIS BARNES 

"Doddic" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 
Honor Roll 1: Debating Club s; Gl*e Club l. 2. 
4: Orchestra 3: Junior Decorating Commit tez 3: 
Class History Committee \: Tennis 2: (Am 
Exhibition 1: Lunchroom Dui\ 2. 3: On retta 
1. 2: Reflector Staff \: Student Council 3, 4. 
Attractive and sweet. 
She's a joy to meet. 



EDWIN A BARNES 

"Eddie" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 
Honor Roll 1; Home Room Messenger 3; Deb- 
ating Clul) 2; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Class Prophecy 
Committee, Chairman 4; Tennis 2; Basketball 
2: Gym Exhibition 1, 2; Lunchroom Duty 2, 3; 
Operetta 1, 2; Reflector Staff 3, 4; Student Coun- 
cil 2, 3; Candy girl at football games 1, 2, 3; 
Class Accompanist 1, 2, 3. 

Beauty, personality, wit, 
Each of these exactly fit. 

CHRISTINE BARRY 

"Teena" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 
Home Room Messenger 1; Book Club 4; Glee 
Club 2, 3, 4; Junior Party Committee 3; Operetta 
2. Reflector Staff 4; Student Council Member 
1: Hygiene Certificate 3; Class Banquet Com- 
mittee 4. 

Sometimes sad, sometimes gay, 
But we like her, anyway. 

ELEANOR BATES 

"El" 

Weymouth Heights Classical Course 
Honor Roll 1; Secretary of Debating Club 3; 
Glee Club 1, 2. 3; Class Prophecy Committee 4; 
Volleyball 2; Girls' Tennis 3; Gym Exhibition 1, 
2; Operetta 1, 2; Reflector Staff 4; Assistant 
Student Council Member 3. 

Slie has a kind and gentle face, 
And is full of charm and grace. 

FLORENCE A. BATES 

"Flossie" 

Weymouth Landing Home Economics 
C\m Exhibition 1; Waitress at Reflector ban- 
quet 2; Usher at Operetta 4; Style Show 2; 
Usher at Marionette Show 4. 

A willing helper to all. 

ELIZABETH M. BENTLEY 

"Betty" 

Weymoufh Landing Business Course 
Mr. Stewart's Secretary 4; Basketball 1; Base- 
ball 1; Lunchroom Duty 3, 4; Usher at Operetta 
y, Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 3; Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for 80 words a minute 
|; Gym Exhibition 1. 

Belly is always fair and square, 
As you can see by her red hair. 

LILLIAN A. BERRY 

"Bunny" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Spanish Club 4: Girl's Glee Club 1, 2; Basketball 
1; Field Hockey 1; Reflector staff 4; Gregg Short- 
hand Theory Certificate 3; Gregg Transcrip- 
tion Certificate for 80 and 100 words a minute 
|: Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1, 2; 
Lunchroom Duty 4: Usher at Senior Play 4. 
Depend on her you know you can, 
Because she always is on hand. 



PAUL H. BIRKEMOSE 

North Weymouth Technical Course 
When lie blushes, look out, girls. 



MURIEL L. BLACKWELL 

"Mickie" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 
Honor Roll 1; Home Room Messenger 4; Book 
Club 4; French Club Secretary 4; Glee Club 1, 
2, 3; Class Outing Committee 3; Who's Who 
Committee 4; Baseball 2; Volleyball 2; Operetta 
2: Reflector Staff 4; Usher at Operetta 3. 
A kind and sweet disposition has she, 
And willt Iter ice always like to be. 



FILLMORE T. BLAISDELL 

"Fill" 

North Weymouth General Course 
Junior Decorating Committee 3; Junior Prom 
Committee 3; Wrestling 4; Gym Exhibition 2. 
Happy am I; from care I'm free. 
Why aren't they all content like me. 



ALTON S. BLANCHARD, JR. 

"Al" "Bud" 
East Weymouth Business Course 
Debating Club 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pres- 
ident 4; Operetta 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Clothing Com- 
mittee 4; Senior Plav \. 
Always head and shoulders above the crowd. 



FLORENCE C. BOUDREAU 

"Flo" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 
Book Club 4; Indoor Baseball 1, 2 Volleyball 
1. 2; Candy Girl at Opereta 3; Class Clothing 
Committee 4. 

Her ready wit and cheery smile 
Proclaim to all a friend worthwhile. 



RALPH W. BOURASSA 
"Bus" 

North Weymouth General Course 
funior Party Committee 3; Christmas Party 
Committee \. 

A little nonsense now and then 
Is relished by the best of men. 



•47 



RITA B. BOWIE 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Four Year Honor Roll; Junior High Office 3, 4: 
Glee Clul) 2, 3: Spanish Club 4; Class Will Com 
mittee 4; Gym Exhibition 1; Operetta 2. 3; 
Reflector Staff 3, 4: Alumni Editor 4; Cand\ 
Girl at Operetta 4: Gregg Shorthand Theory 
Certificate 3: Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 80 and 100 words a minute; Home Room 
Spelling Bee Champion 1. 

Rita's friendly spirit 
Adds much to her merit. 



JANET BRAYSHAW 

"Jan" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Class Nominating Committee 4; Gregg Short- 
hand Theory Certificate 3; Basehall 1, 2, 3; 
Basketball 1. 2. 3; Track 1, 2: Vollevhall 1. 2, 3; 
Field Hockey 1; Tennis 3; Gym Exhibition 1, "2, 
3- 

Janet always plays the game, 

To see it through—and not for fame. 



ANNA N. CACCARO 

"A nn" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Honor Roll 1. 2: Glee Club 1; Spanish Club \: 
Field Hockey 1: Student Council 2; Gregg Short- 
hand Theory Certificate 3; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 80 and 100 words a minute 4; 
Cand) Girl at Senior l'la\ \. 

Here is one -who is a prize, 
R( 'gfiyrflcss of hey t harini ng size. 



LOUISE CALLOWAY 

" Woozie" 

South We) mouth General Course 
Camera Club 2: Basketball 1: Gym Exhibition 
1: Graduation Reception Committee 4. 
Dimpled cheeks, laughing eyes, 
And a smile that, is a prize. 



ELIZABETH CAMERON 

"Betty" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Glee Club i, 2: Basketball 1. 

Sunny and sincere. 



HELEN M. CAREY 

"Honeychile" 
fast Weymouth Business Course 

Spanish Club \: Basketball 1; Field Hockey 1 
// you think Helen is very shy, 
Just look at the merry twinkle in her eye. 



CHARLES R. CAVANAGH 

"Charlie" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 
Glee Club 1, 3, 4; Band 2, 3, 4; Junior Party 
Committee 3; Class Prophecy Committee 4; 
Opeictta 2. 3, 4; Senior Play |. 

I'm the master of my fate, 

The captain of my soul. 



A. ROSEMARY CHAPLIN 

"Rose" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 
four Year Honor Roll French Club 3, 4; Basket- 
ball 2: Volleyball 1. 2; Gym Exhibition 2; Class 
Clothing Committee 4: L'sher at Marionette 
.'how 4. 

./ true 111 list and sincere friend. 



CORA P. CHAPMAN 

"Coke" "Chappy" 
South Weymouth Business Course 
Basketball 1. 2: Volleyball 2; Gym Exhibi- 
tion 1. 

She i'as indeed a merry wit, 
And is not shy of using it. 



BARBARA A. CHEVERIE 

"Babs" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Gym Exhibition 1: Gregg Certificate for 80 
uoids a minute 4. 

A winning smii" goes a long icay, 
'I'd help us pass a pleasant day. 



JOHN B. CAMPBELL 

"J.B." 

Fast Weymouth Agricultural Course 
[unioi Part) Committee |: Wrestling |. 
Full of joke and jest. 



RALPH T. CIPULLO 

"Cip" 

Fast Weymouth Business Course 

Easy come. Easy go. 



49 



VIRGINIA CIRIGLIANO 

"Ciggie" 

East W"e\ mouth Business Course 

Spanish Club "4; Christmas Party Committee [: 
Basketball 1. 

Dependable and helpful all the day, 
Talking and lauglti>ig along the ivay. 



ROBERT V. COLEMAN 

"Bob" 

Son 1 1 1 Weymouth Technical Course 
Four Year Honor Roll; ( lass Nominating Com- 
mittee 3; Track 3, 4; (captain 4); Reflector Staff 
2, 3, |; Business Manager \; Student Council l; 
Class Outing Committee \. 

Logical consequences arc the 
beacons of wise men. 



JOHN CLANCY 
Weymouth Landing Classical Course 
Intramural Basketball 1; Junior Decorating 
Committee 3; Student Council Assistant 4; Class 
Banquet Committee j. 

Oh, Johnny, oh! 



ELAINE T. CLAPP 

North W'evmouth Classical Course 
Class Dues Collector 3; Junior Party Commit- 
tee 3: Class History Committee 4; Basketball 1; 
Gym Exhibition 1; Lunchroom Dutv 4; Student 
Council 4; Home Room Spelling Bee Champ- 
ion 3: Senior Dance Committee 4. 

She has rhythm in her step, 
And is full Of Inn and pep. 



DOROTHY M. CONDRICK 

"Dot" 

East Weymouth Classical Course 

Tour 'Sear Honor Roll; Home Room Messenger 
3; Book Club 4; French Club 4; Glee Club 1: 
Class Prophecy Commute |; Musical Revue 1; 
Reflector staff 4; Usher at Operetta 3. 

A well-loved young lady who is both cute 

ami sensiblt — that's Dorothy. 



ROBERT E. CONNOLLY 

"Bob" 

Weymouth Landing Classical Course 

Home Room Messenger 2. 4; Class Prophecy 
Committee 4. 

Wavy red hair, eyes of blue, 
Teeth like hearts, and handsome loo! 



GEORGE C. CLARK 

"Cla rkie" 

Wevmouth Landing Business Course 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 2. 

He shall have music. 



ELIZABETH V. CODY 

"Betty" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
sher at Operetta 4. 

Her bright eyes are most attractive 
and betray to us the jolly nature 
which is hers. 



JAMES V. CONSENTINO 

"Coke" 

Fast Weymouth General Course 

Home Room Messenger 1, 2: Baseball 
Track 2. 3; Football i, 2. 3. j; Wrestling i, 
3, 4; Gym Exhibition 1, 2; Lunchroom I)nt\ 
Student Council 1. 

Hire's to "The Sport" 

an all round good fellow. 



AUDREY COOKE 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Home Room Messenger 2; Christmas Party 
Committee 4: Reflector stafl 2. Gregg Short- 
hand Theory Certificate 3. 

What will the faculty do without her! 



B. RALPH COLASANTI 

"Ben" 

East Weymouth General Course 

Who's Who Committee 4. 

A gentleman at all times. 



HELEN M. CORCORAN 

North Wevmouth Business Course 

Usher at Operetta 4. 

I little person with " broad heart. 



51 



GEORGE COREY 
South Weymouth General Course 
Class Prophecy Committee 4; Wrestling 3; 
Baseball Manager 4; Christmas party Entei- 
tainment 4. 

Georgie can wrestle, box, or fight. 

He's a short little fellow and very bright. 



CYNTHIA E. COWING 

'Cyn" 

Weymouth Lauding Classical Course 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Tennis 2, 3, 
\: Lunchroom Duty 1, 2, 3; Operetta 2, 3. 

Cynthia and good-looking clothes are synonyms. 
She is the envy of us all, but then the envy 
is overcome by the affection we have for her. 



INEZ C. CORNELL 

"Pete" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Spanish Club 4. 

She is carefree now and then, 
Yet her work she will not shun. 



CATHERINE M. COYLE 

"Kay" "Cathie" 
North Weymouth Business Course 
Class Nominating Committee 4; Basketball 1, 2; 
Track i, 2; Volleyball 1. 2; Gym Exhibition 2. 
When one's in need, 
She's a friend indeed. 



LEONA F. COTE 

"Lee" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Class Nominating Committee 3; Class Outing 
Committee 3; Class Prophecy Committee 4; 
Gym Exhibition 1. 2; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 80 words a minute 4. 
Personality, neatness, and laughter are hers. 
May they remain with her all through the years. 



JAMES W. COYLE 

"Jimmy" "Flash" 
North Weymouth General Course 
Debating Club President 4: Class Outing Com 
mittee 3; Intramural Basketball 2: Track 1. 2, 
3, 4: Gym Exhibition 2. 

His amiable disposition has won him many 
friends. 



ROBERT F. COUGHLIN 

"Bob" "Float" 
Weymouth Landing General Course 
Senior Dance Committee 4; Intramural Basket- 
ball i, 2. 

Into everyone's life some rain must fall, 
Except in Bob's there's none at all. 



ESTHER M. CRONE 
East Weymouth Home Economics 
Home Room Messenger 3, 4; 4-H Club 2; 
funior Decorating Committee 3; Gym Exhib- 
ition 1, 2; Style Show 1; Candy Girl at Operetta 
2. 3, 4; Waitress at Reflector Banquet 2, 3; Class 
Banquet Committee 4. 

Small, Blonde, and Sweet. 



MURIEL F. COURTNEY 

_"Mike" 

East Wevmouth Business Course 

Home Room Messengei |: Book Club |: Gregg 
Shorthand Theory Certificate 3; Home Room 
Spelling Bee Champion 4. 

Everybody as a friend, - -- — 

Doing kind things without anjeixd. _ ._ . . 



ARTHUR L. CROSSMAN 

"Bud" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
funioi Part) Committee 3: Christmas Part) 
Committee 4; Class Nominating Committee 4; 
Basketball 3. 4; Football 4; Track 4; Gym Exhib- 
ition 2: Graduation Reception Committee 4. 

A firm believer in the maxim, "Better 

late than never.'' 



LORRAINE G. COWETT 

"Rainie" 

Wevmouth Landing Business Course 
Glee Club 1, 3; Junior Decorating Committee 3; 
Who's Who Committee 4: Gym Exhibition 2; 
Operetta 1, 3; Gregg Shorthand Theory Cer- 
tificate 3. 

Tall, slim, and pretty, unlike other girls, 
With dark brownish hair and natural curls 



LAURENCE J. CULLIVAN 

"Larry" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

j-H Club l. 2: Glee Club 1; Gym Exhibition 1: 
Junior Party Committee 3: Christmas Part) 
Committee 4: Graduation Reception Com- 
mittee 4. 

Short, light, but handsome. 

• ' ' 03 



RICHARD N. CURTIS 

"Dick" 

Weymouth Heights Technical Course 

Chess Club 3; Christmas Party Committee 4. 

"Determined" and "laconic" describes Curtis 
well. 



U. JUNE DAVISON 

South Weymouth General Course 
Glee Club 3, 4; Spanish Club 4; Junior Party 
Committee 3; Girls' Tennis Team 3, (.; Operetta 
3; Program Sellei at Thanksgiving Football 
Game 4; Candy Girl at Senior l'la\ |. 

Mistress of herself though China fall. 



JAMES DALY 

"Jim" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 2, 3; Book 
Club 3. 

A fairly quiet unusual sort, 
Talks very little but says a lot. 



HAROLD DECOSTE 
Weymouth Heights General Course 
Track 2. 

SIou> and steady wins the race. 



M. ELAINE DALY 
South Weymouth Business Course 
Book Club 3; Junior Party Committee 3; Usher 
at Senior Play 4. 

Anything worth doing is worth doing well. 



PRISCILLA A. DENNTSON 

"Prill" 

East Weymouth Classical Course 

Home Room Messenger 1; Chess Club 1, 2, 
Who's Who Committee 4: Gym Exhibition 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1, 2. 
The gentle mind by gentle deeds is knoiun. 



VERA H. DANIELS 

"Peggy" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Class Dues Collector 3: Gym Exhibition i. 2; 
Red Cross Certificate 3; Usher at Senior Pla) |. 
A quiet girl you think you see, 
But you may be wrong concerning inc. 



TIMOTHY A. DESMOND 

"Tim" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Home Room Messenger 3; Cross Country 2; 
Wrestling 1, 2, 3: Class Outing Committee |; 
Golf 4. 

Hang sorrow! Care will kill a cat, 
And therefore let's be merry. 



RITA L. DARRIN 

"lit" 

East Weymouth Home Economics 
j-H Club 2; Junior Decorating Committee 3; 
Gun Exhibition v, 2; Style Show 1; Candy Girl 
a! Operetta 2. 

Rita is a wee lass with a never ceasing good 

nature. 



W ILLIAM F. DESMOND 

"Bill" 

\Vc\ mouth Landing Classical Course 
Junior Nominating Committee 3; Junior Dec- 
orating Committee \: Class Prophec) Commu- 
te |: Baseball 3; Intramural Basketball 1, 2. 3; 
Lunchroom Committee 4; Baseball \. 

For every why he has a wlicrcforc. 



PATRICIA M. DAVIS 

"Pat" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 3; Gregg 
Shorthand Certificate for 80 words a minute 4; 
Candy girl at Senior Class Play 4; Class Outing 
Committee 4. 

She has a shy smile— or is it mischievous. 



ANNA DeVOGEL 

Weymouth Heights Business Course 
Candy Girl at Operetta 4 : Gregg Theory Cert- 
ificate 3: Gregg Transcription Certificate for So 
words a minute 4. 

Happy-go-lucky, from care she is free. 



.).) 



ELIZABETH R. DIZER 

"Betty" "Lizzy Diz" 
East Weymouth Classical Course 
Senior Prom Dance Committee (; Field Hocke\ 
i: Volleyball i, 2; Musical Revue 1; Operetta 
2. 3: Lunchroom Dim 3; Usher at Alumni Re- 
union 3: Candy Girl at Teachers' Play 4; 
Freshman-Senior Part) Entertainment 1; Re- 
flector Staff Entertainment 2, 3. 

Come and trip it as ye go 
On the light fantastic toe. 

JOSEPH W. DON A HOE 

"Joe Blow" 

\Ve\ mouth Landing Business Course 
Senior Dance Committee 4; Football 2. 3; 
Tennis 4: Usher at Graduation 3. 

Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more; 

Men were deceivers ever. 



WINDSOR DURBECK 

"Win" 

South Weymouth Technical Course 

Science Club \: Orchestra 1; Class History Com- 
mittee j: Class Outing Committee 3: lia<k 1: 
Gym Exhibition 1. 2, 3; Ticket CollectOl at 
Senior Play, 4. 

He 1 luil runs it well, runs twice his race. 



JAMES F. DWYER 

"Jim" 

North Weymouth General Course 
Glee Club 1, 4; Graduation Reception Com- 
mittee 4. 

Happy am I; from care I'm free. 

Why aren't they all contented like me? 



VIRGINIA E. DOYLE 

"Gini" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 
Class Secretary 3, 4; Home Room Messenger 
4; French Club 4; Junior Prom Committee 3; 
Nominating Committee 3; Class Outing Com- 
mittee 3; Student Council 1, 3; D. A. R. Candi- 
date 4. 

She is good as she is fair, 
None— none on earth above her! 
As pure in thought as angels are. 
To know her is to love her. 

EUGENE DUNCAN 

"Gene" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 

Baseball, 4; Class Clothing Committee. 4. 
I'll warrant him heart-whole. 



MARY M. DWYER 

"Shorty "M. D." 
Weymouth Landing Classical Course 
Book Club 4; Nominating Committee 4. 
Gay good nature sparkles in her eyes. 



LAURA C. EL KINGTON 

"Elkie" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Home Room Messenger 3; Book Club 4: Span- 
ish Club 4; Junior High School Office 4. 
Never worry. It doesn't pay. 



B. CLAIRE DUNN 
South Weymouth Business Course 

Glee Club t; Junior Outing Committee 3; 

4; 



•art) Committee 



Red Cross 



Christmas 
Award. 

Capable, efficient, and charming of manner. 

PRISCILLA DUNN 

"Pris" 

Weymouth Heights Business Course 

Trade School Office 4; Girls' Glee Club" 1, 2; 
Junior Decorating Committee 3; Tennis 1; 
Reflector Staff 2. 3, 4; Gregg Shorthand Theory 
Certificate 3; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 
eighty words a minute 4; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 100 words a minute, 4; Class Motto 
Committee, 4. 

Ready, willing, and able. 



C. ELIZABETH ELLARD 

East \\e\momli Classical Course 

Honor Roll i, 2; Reflectoi Representative for 
Book Club 4: French Club 3. 1; Junior l'aity 
Committee 3; Reflector Stall 3. 4; Usher at 
Operetta 3; Usher at Alumni Receltion 3; Can- 
dy Girl at Teacher's Play |. 

Silence is better tlian speech. 



JEAN E. ELLIS 

North Weymouth Classical Course 
Book Club 4; Helled or •>; Class Banquet 
Committee 4. 

A penny for your thoughts. 



VERNON W. FARRAR 

"Mutt" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Intramural Basketball 2. 3; Yawn Basketball 
3; Lunchroom Dut\ 2. 

Let the world slide. 



EARNEST M. FARREN 

"Ernie" 

Smith Weymouth Agricultural Course 
.Student Council i, 2. 3; Luchroom Duty 2; 
Weymouth Trade Basketball 3: Mass. Poultry 
Judging Contests at Mass. State College 1, 2, 3, 4; 
State Poultry Judging Contest— second place 4. 
Keep thy farm, and thy farm will keep thee. 



P. JOSEPH FAY 

"Joe" 

Weymouth Landing Technical Course 
Science Club 4. 

Napoleon avis also a small man. 



NANCY C. FEILDING 

"Nan" 

North Wemouth General Course 
Junior Decorating Committee 3; Who's Who 
Committee 4: Reflector Staff 3, 4, Art Editor 
4: Student Council Manual, Assistant Editor 4; 
l'sher at Puppet Show 4. 

True as the needle to the pole, 
Or as the dial to the sun. 



PAULINE FINN 

"Polly" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Home Room Messenger 1; Book Club 4; 
Basketball 1; Field Hockev 1: Tennis 3, 4; Volley 
ball i; Gym Exhibition 1; Class Clothing Com- 
mittee 4. 

Much ado about nothing. 



ELEANOR M. FISH 

"Ele" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Gregg Transcription Theory Certificate 3; 
Gregg Transcription Award for Ho words a min- 
ute and for 100 words a minute; L'sher at 
Senior Class Play 4. 
The past unsighed for, and the future sure. 



ROSEMARY W. FITZGERALD 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Book Club 1: Basketball 1. 2; Usher at Senior 
Play, 4. 

Never let homework stand in the way of plea- 
sure. 



C. LOUISE FOLEY 

" W'eesee" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Class Dues Collector 3, 4: Secretary to Mr. 
Hilmer Nelson 4; Class Prophecy Committee 
4: Gregg Theory Certificate 3; Gregg Transcrip- 
tion Award for 80 words a minute; Gregg Tran- 
scription Award for 100 words a minute, 4. 
She is pretty to walk with, witty to talk with, 
And pleasant, too, to think on. 



W ILLIAM FOPIANO 

"Bill" "Fop" 
South Weymouth General Course 
Oh, how full of briers is this working-day world! 



ANNETTE C. FORD 

"Chuggy" "Fordy" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Spanish Club 4; Junior Decorating Committee 
3; Class Prophecy Committee 4; Gregg Short- 
hand Theory Certificate 3. 

With laughing exes, and merry smile, 
Her disposition happy all the while. 



HELEN FORTIER 

East Weymouth Classical Course 

Usher at Operetta 4. 

They are never alone who are accompanied with 
noble thoughts. 



DOROTHY B. FRANCIS 

"Dot" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 

Chess Club 3; Basketball 1. 2; Baseball 2; Gym 
Exhibition 1, 2. 

Give thy thoughts no tongue. 



59 



MARION FREDRICKSON 
South Weymouth Business Course 
Class Will Commit tec \; Book Club 4; Glee 
Club 1. 3. 4: Musical Revue 1; Home Room 
Spelling Bee Champion .4. 

/ am never merry when I hear sweet music. 



rOSEPH F. GALLANT 

"Augic" 

Weymouth Landing General Course 
Christmas Part) Committee |: Basketball 3: 
Operetta \. 

Gabriel, blow tliy sax! 



MILDRED E. FRIMANSON 

"Millie" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 3; Gregg 
Shorthand Transcription Certificate for eighty 
words a minute 4: Gregg Shorthand Transcrip- 
tion for 100 words a minute j; Usher at Oper- 
etta 4. 

She that was ever fair ami never proud 
Had tongue at will, and yet was never loud. 



WILLIAM C. GARRITY 

"Bill" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Class Nominating Committee 4: Tennis 2, 3, 4; 
Manager (; Reflet lor Staff 4; Assistant Student 
Council 4; Usher at Graduation 3; Class Ban- 
quet ( Committee 4. 

Beware of a quiet temperament. 



JOHN FUCCI 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Baseball y; Lunchroom Duty 1. 

He is a -wise man -who speaks a Utile. 



ROBERT W. GATELY 

'"Bob" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
(.\in Exhibition 1, 2; Lunchroom Duty 4; 
Wrestling 2. 3, |. 

The best are often silent. 



HELEN B. FULLER 
Weymouth Business Course 

Home room messenger 1; Glee Club 1; Spanish 
Club 4: Student Council 4; Reflector Staff 4; 
Lunchroom Dim 1; junior High Office 4; Gregg 
Shorthand Theory Certificate 3; Graduation 
Reception Committee 4; Assistant Editor of 
Student Council Handbook 1; Gregg Shorthand 
Transcription Certificate 4. 

The lady doth protest too much, methinks. 



MARIO E. GATTO 

"Moe" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

( '.is- Nominating Committee 3: Junior Decor- 
ating Committee 3; Lunchroom Duty 4: Intra- 
mural Basketball 1; Football 2, 3, 4: Track 1, 2; 
Wrestling 2, 3, 4; Gym Exhibition 1, 2. 

There's an old proverb— 

"He that does great is great himself." 



ALBERT H. GADD 

"Al" 

South Hanson Agricultural Course 
Poultr) Judging leant 2: Dair\ Judging Team 
3. 4. 

The mirror of all courtesy. 



RALPH J. GELINAS, JR. 
South Weymouth General Course 
Smart— 'when he wants to be. 



ELIZABETH R. GAIN FY 

"Betty" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

One xiast substantial smile. 



HELEN C. GENCHAUSK] 

North We\ mouth Business Course 

Home Room Messenger 3; Class Dues Collectoi 
3. 4; Spanish Club 4. 

Let not your heart be troubled. 



6l 



BARRY N. GIBSON ALICE J. GRIFFIN 

"Pork" "A I lie" 

East Weymouth Business Course East Weymouth Business Course 
Chess Club Champion 2, 3. They say she's lull 0) fun. 

His mischievous reputation is far renowned. 



CATHERINE V. GILLIS 

"Catty" 

East Weymouth Business Course 
Junior Prom Committee 3; Class Nominating 
Committee 3; Basketball 3; Class History 4; 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 3. 

History bores her, but she always remembers 

her dates. 



BARBARA L. GRIFFIN 

"Barb" 

East Weymouth General Course 

Glee Club \: Gyin Exhibition 2: Lunchroom 
Duty 3, 4; Operetta 4; Cand\ Girl at Oper- 
etta 3: Waitress at Reflector Staff Banquet 4; 
Usher at Senior Class Play. 

No one is happy -who does not tliiuli himself so. 



RUTH E. GILLFS 

"Butch" "Gill" "Killer" 
East Weymouth Classical Course 
Four Year Honor Roll: Lunchroom Duty 2, 3, 
4; Operetta 1, 2: Candy Girl at Teachers Pla\ 
4: Candy Girl rft Operetta 4: Csher at Operetta 
3; Waitress at Reflector Banquet 3, 4. 
Red hair, smiling eyes, 
A nimble brain that is a prize. 



CURTISS B. GLADWIN 

"Curt" 

North Weymouth General Course 
Christmas Part} Committee 4; Home Room 
Spelling Bee Champion 2. 3. 

A light of humor follows him wherever he may 
be. 



JOHN T. GUNN 

"Ben" "Joe" 
South Weymouth Classical Course 
( lass Nominating Committee \; Football 2, 3, 
\; Intramural Basketball 2; Home Room Spell- 
ing Bee Champion 2; Winner of American 
Legion Oratorical Contest 4: Class Marshal 4. 
Fun is my watchword. 



ROSEMARY C. HACKETT 

"Rose" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 
Junior Prom Committee 3; Seniot Dance Com- 
mittee 4; Gym Exhibition 1; Usher at Alumni 
Meeting. 

She's worthy of everyone's acquaintance. 



ROBERT V. GLOSTER 

"Red" 

We\ mouth Landing General Course 
Intramural Basketball 1, 2; Gym Exhibition 1: 
Basketball 2, 3. 4; Lunchroom Duty 4; Class 
.Motto Committee 4. 

Ladies' delight. 



MARION G. HAN ABU RV 

"Dida" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Lunchroom Dut\ 5; (.lee Club 1; Class Will 
Committee 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 80 words a minute; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate lor 100 words a minute. 

Small and lair 
Willi a men y air. 



MERTON R. GRANT 

"Mert" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Class Outing Committee 4. 

/ waste no words. 



BETH E. HAYNES 
South Weymouth Business Course 

Basketball 1, 2; Glee Club 3; Gym Exhibition 2: 
Home Room Treasurer 2: Spanish club [; 
( lass Banquet Committee 4; Camera Club \. 
Dancing is her sport. 



EDWARD R. HEINSTROM 

"Eddie" "Hienie" 
South Weymouth General Course 
Homeroom Vice President 2: Debating Club 
3; 4-H Club 1, 2. ;j. 4; Glee Club 2: Track 2; 
Wrestling 2; Lunchroom Duty 1. 2, 3, 4; Student 
Council 1, 2, 3, 4; i-H Home Improvement 1, 
s. 3. 4. 

// you don't know, ask questions. 



FRANK E. HERSEY 

"Frankie" 

North Wevmouth Technical Course 
Home Room Messenger j: Class Prophecy Com- 
mittee 1; I icket Collector at Operetta 1; Home 
Room Secretary 2: Entertainment Committee 
for Christmas Party 4. 

Frank is the school's weather prophet. 



WILLIAM D. HICKEY 

"Bill" 

East Wevmouth Agricultural Course 
4 H Club r. 

/ never remain alcne in my thoughts. 



FRANK W. HO MEYER 

"Horner" "Rubber" "Sag" 
South Weymouth General Course 
Glee Club i, 2; Band 3; Tennis 2; Home Room 
President 2; I ennis ream |. 
To have a good time is to have everything. 



C. LEE HOPKINS 

"Lee" 

South Weymouth Technical Course 
Camera Club 2; Who's Who Committee (: In- 
tramural Basketball 1, 2; Lunchroom Dun \: 
Student Council Assistant 4. 

Ahunting we will go. 



MARJORIE W. HORN 

"Margie" 

North Wevmouth Business Course 
Reflector Staff Entertainment 1, 2; Candy Girl 
at Operetta 3; Class Nominating Committee 3, 
4; Usher at Operetta 4. 

Singing is one of Iter many assets. 



LOIS H. HOLBROOK 

"Lo" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Home Room Messenger 2; Honor Roll 2: Span- 
ish Club 4; Basketball 2: Class Prophec) Com- 
mittee 4; Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 
for eighty words a minute 4; Gregg Transcrip- 
tion Certificate for too words a minute |. Hume 
Room Spelling Bee Champion |. 

No one knows wiiat he can do till he tries. 



ALMA M. HOUDE 

"Houdie" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
funinor Prom Committee 3; Christmas Part) 
Committee 4; Class Nominating Committee \: 
Gym Exhibition 1; Gregg Transcription Cer- 
tificate for So words a minute. 

Where there's a will there's a way. 



LORRAINE L. HOLBROOK 

"Rainy" 

East Wevmouth Business Course 

C lass Dues Collector 3; Basketball ; ; C,\m 
Exhibition 2; Gregg Shorthand Theory Certi- 
ficate 3: Gregg Transcription Certificate for 80 
words a minute; Usher at Senior Play 4. 
A little fun now. and then doesn't hurt anyone. 



PAULINE F. HOUSE 

"Paulie" "Housie" 
East Weymouth General Course 

funior Prom Committee 3; Senior Dance Com- 
mittee 4; Athletic Dance Committee 1; Volley- 
ball 1; Lunchroom Duty 1, 2; Student Council 
r, 2; Candy Girl at Operetta 2; Usher at Alum- 
ni Meeting; Honor Roll 4. 

Polly's admirers are uncountable. 



ETHEL J. HOLLAND 

South Weymouth Classical Course 
Honor Roll 1; French Club 4: Glee Club 1, 2. 
3. |; Operetta 2, 3; Candy Girl at Senior 
I>la\ 4. 

There is a place in this world for one with 
talent. 



RITA M. HUNT 

"Reet" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Spanish Club 4; Basketball 2; Gregg Shorthand 
Theory Certificate 3. 

Her jovial manner makes many friends. 



MANNING T. JANNELL 

"Mai," 

South Weymouth Technical Course 
Glee Club 1; Cross-country 4: Operetta 1; In- 
tramural Basketball 1. |: Lunchroom Dut\ 2. 
3. 4; Student Council 2. 3; Christmas Party 
Committee 4: Book Room 1, 2. 3. 4; Assistant 
Track Coach 4. 

He is the man about town. 



BARBARA E. JOHNSON 

"Johnny" "Babs" 
Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Basketball 2. 

Dependability is an admirable quality. 



EILEEN C. JOHNSON 

East Weymouth Classical Course 
Home Room Messenger 1: Book Club 4; French 
Club 4: Class Propheo Committee 4; Usher at 
Operetta 4; Reflector Staff 4. 

Her smile is a treat to the eye. 



JOSEPHINE V. KEBLIS 

"Keb" "Keby" "Joe" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Class Treasurer 3, 1; Class Dues Collector 3, 
|: (.lee Club 1; [unior Decorating Committee 3: 
junior Part) Committee 3; Christmas Part) 
Committee ); Lunchroom Dun 2. 3. \: Student 
Council 4, Assistant 2, 3; Ushei ai Operetta 3: 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 3; Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for eighty words a min- 
ute; Junior Outing Committee 3; 

Nimble fingers and an active mind. 



PAUL KEEFE 

"Keefie" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Junior Prom Committee 3: Christmas Party 
Committee 4; Intramural Basketball 2. 3, 4. 
Here I am, girls. Fight over me. 



FRANCIS KELLEY 

"Kelt" "Frannie" "Shoe" "Bud" 
Loyell's Corner Technical Course 
Camera Club 2, 3; Christmas Party Committee 4; 
Class Motto Committee 4. 

Why worry when the future takes care of itself? 



RICHARD A. JORDAN 

"Dick" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 
Freshman-Senior Party Committee 1, Entertain- 
ment Committee Senior Party 4: Class History 
Committee 4: Gym Exhibition 1; Senior Play 
Music 4. 

/ have often regretted my speech, never my 
silence. 



JAMES F. KELLEY 

"Kelley" 

Weymouth Landing General Course 
Class Picture Committee 4; Gym Team 4: Gym 
Exhibition 1. 2. 3; Football 1, 2. 

Generally seems to be hungry. 



VIRGINIA C. KAI 

"Ginnie" 

North Weymouth Home Economics Course 
Lunchroom Duty 3: Candy Girl at Operetta t, 
2, 3; Waitress at Reflector Banquet 3. 4; Style 
Show 1; Class Clothing Committee 4. 

Her manner quiet and her nature mild. 



ALICE KARA I AN 

"A I lie" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Lunchroom Dim 

So quiet until you know her. 



MARIE L. KELLEY 

"Re" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 
Home Room Messenger 3; Book Club 4; French 
Club 3, 4: Junior Party Committee 4. 
Where wisdom steers 
Wind cannot make you sink. 



THOMAS J. KELLY 

" Tom" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
( lass Outing Committee 3: Home Room Mess- 
enger 3; Junior Part) Committee 3; Junior 
Prom Committee 3; Baseball 3, |; Basketball 3. 
4; Intramural Basketball 3, 4; Class Outing Com- 
mittee 4. 

Has anyone here seen Kelly? 



•67 



DORIS F. KINCAID 

"Kinky" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Honor Roll 1; Junior Tarty Committee 3: Junioi 
Outing Committee 3; Christmas Part) Com- 
mittee 4; Senior Prom Committee 4: G\m Ex- 
hibition 1, 2: Reflector Stall 3. 4; Gregg 'Trans- 
cription Certificate for eighty words a minute. 
Candid camera fiends, here I am— Snap! 



JENNIE LANG " 

"Honey" 

East Weymouth Home Economics Course 
Gym Exhibition 1, 2; Lunchroom I)ut\ 3, |: 
Candy Girl al Operetta \: Waitress ai Reflectoi 
Banquet 2; Style Show 1; Cooking Exhibition v. 
A si itch in lime saves nine. 



AGNES G. KINSLEY 

"Aggie" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Home Room Messenger 4; Glee Club 3; Gregg 
Shorthand Theory Certificate 4; Honor Roll v. 
With a smile on her lips. 



HAROLD F. LaPOINTE 

"Lappy" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
They say 'tis the wise man who speaks little. 



NATALIE P. KOSARICK 

"Nat" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Debating Club 4: 4— H Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Mixed 
Glee Club 1, 2. 3. 4; Girl's Glee Club 4; Musical 
Revue 1; Operetta 2. 3, 4: Reflector Staff 3, 4; 
Harmony 1; Attendance Collector 4; Reflector 
League Entertainment 3, 4. 

Who could be true to eyes of blue 
When brown eyes smile at you/ 



JOSEPH F. LAMBE 

"Joe" 

East Weymouth Classical Course 

Home Room Messenger 1. 2; Class Nominating 
Committee 4: Junior Party Committee 3; Golf 3. 
4: Student Council 2. 3; Intramural Basketball 
1, 2; Lunchroom Dut\ 2. 3; Basketball 3, Gradu- 
ation Reception and Dance Committee 4. 
We have a goffer in our midst. 



OLIVE A. LAMBRECHT 

"Ollie" 

Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1. 
The deepest river flows most silently. 
It's a fact. 



EVELYN V. LARAMIE 

"Evie" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 
Girl's Glee Club 1: Basketball 1; Honor Roll 
2; Usher at Operetta 4; Sophomore Home Room 
Spelling Champion 2. 

A little package of dynamite. 



VICTORIA LaROCCO 

"Vickie" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Junior Decorating Committee 3: |unioi Part) 
Committee 3. 
The only way to have a friend is to be one. 



ALPHONSO J. LaROSSA 

"Al" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Gym Exhibition 1, |: Wrestling 1. 2, [: Cross- 
Countn 1. 4; Lunchroom Dut) |: Intramural 
Basketball 1, 2. 

Turn around, LaRossa. 



CATHERINE E. LANG 

"Kay" 

East Weymouth Home Economics Course 
Lunchroom Duty 3; Exhibition 1; Waitress at 
Reflector Banquet 2. 

Food is the way to a man's heart. 



ANNA L. LEARY 

"Anna" "Spike" 
South Weymouth Business Course 
Junior Decorating Committee 3; Home Room 
Spelling Bee Champion 3. 

The very flower of youth. 

...69 



MIRIAM G. LESTER 

"Mem" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Junior Prom Committee 3; Usher at Senior 
Play, 4. 

As soon as I get my homework done— fun. 



ANNE M. LEWIS 

"Lewie" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Book Club 4: Christmas Entertainment Com- 
mute 4; Class Historv Committee 4; Usher at 
Operetta 3, Head Usher 4; Gregg Shorthand 
Theory Certificate 3; Class Motto Committee, 4. 
Her maimer is as sweet 
As ever one could meet. 



PETER J. LILLA 

East Weymouth Technical Course 
Who's Who Committee 4. 

A lad of great versatility 
Full of knowledge and ability. 



LILLIAN LITCHFIELD 

South Weymouth Classical Course 
Astronom) Club 2. 3; Camera Club 2, 3. 4; Band 
2, 3, 4; Class Prophecy Committee 4; Basket- 
ball 1, 2; G\m Exhibition 1; Operetta 2. 

Mischief and fun lurk under her sun. 



RITA LITCHFIELD 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Junior Decorating Committee 3; Gym Exhibi- 
tion 2; Candy Girl at Operetta 3; Usher at 
Senior Play, 4. 

It's nice to be natural when you are naturally 
nice. 



MARY E. LOHNES 

"Betty" 

North We\ mouth Business Course 
Home Room Messenger 1; Astronomy Club 1, 2: 
Camera Club 4; French Club 3, 4; Class Proph- 
ec\ Committee 4; Baseball 2, 3; Basketball 3, 
4; Volleyball 3; Home Room Spelling Bee 
Champion, 1; Freshman Spelling Bee Champion 
Volleyball, 4; Baseball, 4. 

Her hair is like the rays of the sun; 

She herself is full of fun. 



HELEN M. LONG 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Class Dues Collector 3; Spanish Club \: Class 
Will Committe 4; Junior Nominating (.0111 
mittee 3; Baseball 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Field 
Hockey 1; Volleyball 2. 3; Gym Exhibition 2; 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 3. 

As dependable as the sun. 



KENNETH A. LORING 

"Ken" 

North Weymouth General Course 
Christmas Party Committee \: Basketball 2; 
Football 2. 3, 4; Wrestling 3; Gym Exhibition 
r, 2, 3, 4; Lunchroom Duty 2, 3, 1; Student 
Council 2, 3, 4. 

Why can't women leave me alone! 



GRACE W. LOUD 

South Weymouth General Course 
Home Room Messenger 2; Astronomy Club 2, 
3; Camera Club 2, 3, 4; Chess Club 2, 3; Glee 
Club 1; Band 2, 3, 4; Who's Who Committee 
4; Operetta 2; Student Council Assistant 3. 

Here is one you'll always find 

Ready, willing, and kind. 



THOMAS A. LYONS, JR. 

"Tom" "Tommy" 
Weymouth Landing Technical Course 
Senior Dance Committee 4; Football 2. 3, 4; 
T rack 2; Gym Exhibition 1; Senior Play 4. 
./ hero in many maids' hearts. 



JEAN MACAFEE 

"Mac" 

South Weymouth Technical Course 
Debating Club 3; French Club Treasurer 3; 
Glee Club 1; Science (Tub 4; Orchestra 3: Class 
Nominating Committee 4: Basketball 1. 2; 
Tennis 1. 2, 3: Track 1: Volleyball 1, 2; Gym 
Exhibition 1, 2; Operetta 1; Reflector Stall \: 
Student Council Assistant 2. 

You stand in your own light. 



ROBERT C. Mac ARTHUR 

"Bob" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 
Basketball 1, 2, 3. \: Football Manager 2. 3. \: 
Intramural Basketball 1. 2: Student Council 
Assistant 4; Class Prophec) Committee |. 
Rome was not built in a daw 
And MacArthur feels that way. 



7> 




I)()l (,I,\SS Mad)()\ M.I) 



U\ IH \r\IHKUSO\ 



( 1 1 \ l< I ( ) I II M.k LEOD 



i k \ \ ( is \i,( \r i in 



( II \ R IIS M.k \l I I 



r\i i McCarthy 



m wi n \i \ \\ 



\IIRI \M Mc< I I 



(.R\(l \I\RI\\I 



1 whs M.nowi.n 



WILLIAM MARSHMAN 



ELEANOR MtGAW 



DOUGLASS R. MACDOXALD 

"Doug" "Mac" 
South Weymouth Classical Course 

Camera Club 1; Chess Club 1. 2, 3. 

Laugh and the world laughs with you. 



CHARLOTTE M. MacLEOD 

"Charlie" 

North \Ve\ mouth Classical Course 
Four Year Honor Roll: Camera Club 4; French 
Club 3. 4: Class Prophecy Committee 4; Junior 
Spelling Bee Champion 3; Senior Spelling Bee 
Champion 4: French Club Play, 4; Senior Pla\ 
4; Senior Spelling Champion, 4. 

The world must have great minds. 



RUTH A. MATHEWSON 

'Rut hie" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Who's Who Committee 4; Gregg Shorthand 
Theory Certificate 3; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 80 words a minute 4. 
A good reputation is more valuable than 
money. 



francis l. McCarthy 

"Mac" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Class Nominating Committee 3, 4; Basketball 
2, 3, 4; Intramural Basketball 2, 3, 4; Usher at 
Graduation 3; Class Banquet Committee, 4. 
Character is the key to fortune. 



CHARLES MacNUTT 

"Chef "Mac" 
Lovell's Corner General Course 

Lunchroom Duty 3, 4; Student Council 3; Senior 
Play, 4. 

Heap big Injun— Xo? 



paul d. McCarthy 

"Mac" 

South Weymouth General Course 

Oh, what is better than a pipe and a book! 



STANLEY MANN 

"Stan" "Shorty" 
South Weymouth Technical Course 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Radio Club 1, 2, 3; Class 
Prophecy Committee 4; Gym Exhibition 1, 2; 
Student Council Assistant 2, 3. 4; Operetta 2; 
Musical Revue 1; Usher at Operetta 3, 4; Book 
Room Dut\ 2, 3. 4: Office Assistant 3; Lunch- 
room Duty 2, 3. 4. 

Every "Mann" has his gift. Stanley's is his 
radio. 



GRACE R. MAR IAN I 

"GraciV 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Short and sweet. 



WILLIAM O. MARSHMAN 

"Bill" "Doc" 
East Weymouth General Course 

Track 2, 4; Gym Exhibition 1; Book Room 
Duty 4; Class Bancpiet Committee, 4. 

Where might my wandering boy be gone? 



MIRIAM A. McCUE 

"Mini" "Tee-hee" 
North Weymouth Classical Course 
Home Room Messenger 4; Glee Club 1, 2; 
Junior Party Committee 3; Class Propheo 
Committee 4; Operetta 1, 2; Student Council 4; 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1, 2 3; 
Class Prophecy Committee, 4. 
Giggle, giggle, giggle! What is she giggling at? 



James f. Mcdonald 

"Jim" "Red" 
North Weymouth Business Course 
Home Room Messenger 3. 

From the crown of his head to the soul of his 
feet, he is all mirth. 



ELEANOR L. McGAW 

"Scotty" "Mac" 
South Weymouth Business Course 
Class Dues Collector 4; Class Outing Committee 
3; Baseball 3; Basketball 3; Volleyball 3; Gym 
Exhibition 1, 2; Lunchroom Duty 3; Student 
Council 3; Class Clothing Committee, 4. 
That ice would do, 
We should do when zee would. 



73 



MARY E. McGLYNN 

"Maria" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Gregg Sorthand Theory Certificate 3; Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for eighty words a 
minute 4: Gregg Transcription Certificate for 
too words a minute. 
The mildest mannas and the gentlest heart. 



ELIZABETH METCALF 

"Libby" "Betty" 
North Weymouth Business Course 

Book Club 3: j-H Club 1, 2; Gregg Shorthand 
Theory Certificate \; Gregg ["ranscription Cer- 
tificate for eight\ words a minute. \. 
Humility, that low, sweet root 
From which all heavenly virtues shoot. 



W ALLACE S. McISAAC 

"Watty" "Mac" 
East Weymouth Technical Course 
Christmas Partv Entertainment 4; Intramural 
Basketball 1, 2. 3; Lunchroom Duty 2; Student 
Council 1. 2. 

He that knows most doubts not. 



DOROTHY V. MILLER 

"Dottie" "Mathy" "Dot" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Glee Club 1. 2: Spanish Club 4; Junior Nomin- 
ating Committee 3: Class Nominating Committee 
4: Volleyball r; Reflectoi Staff 4; Certificate for 
eighty words a minute 4; Graduation Reception 
Committee. 4. 

Xone knew thee but to love thee; 
None named thee but to praise 



EDWARD J. McNEIL 

"Eddie" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Smooth runs the water wliere the brook is deep. 



JULIA R. MEHRMAN 

"Judy " 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Baseball 2; Basketball 2: Volleyball 2; Christ- 
mas Party entertainment 4; Usher at Senior 
Play 4. 

II liate'er she did was done with so much ease, 
In her alone, 'twas natural to please. 



JOSEPH F. MERCURIO 

"Joe" 

North Weymouth Technical Course 
Honor roll 2. 3: Class History Committee 4; 
Operetta 3; Reflector Staff 4; Student Council 
3; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 4. 

// he be not fellow with the best king, 
Thou shall find him the king of good fellows. 



BETTY E. METCALFE 

"Isabel" "Shorty 
South We\ mouth Business Course 
Home Room Messenger 1; Girls' Glee Club 1; 
Spanish Club 4; Usher at Senior Play 1. 
Laugh thy girlish laughter; 
Then the moment after 
Weep thy girlish tears. 



G. HELEN MILLER 

North Weymouth Business Course 

Class Dues Collector 3; French Club 3; Junior 
Party 3; Senior Ch-ristmas Party Committee 4; 
Field Hockey 1; Gym Exhibition 2; Gregg 
Shorthand Theory Certificate 4; Gregg Tran- 
scription Certificate for eighty words a minute 
4; Class Outing Committee. 4. 
Play out the play, 

A merry heart goes all the day. 



ROBERT A. MONROE 

"Bob" 

Weymouth Landing Technical Course 
Home Room Messenger 2; Basketball (Intra- 
mural) 1, 2; Gym Exhibition 2. 

Genius is mainly an affair of energy. 

JEAN L. MORRISON 

"Jeannie" 

Weymouth Landing Classical Course 
Honor Roll 1; French Club 3; Class Prophecy 
Committee 4; Gym Exhibition 1; Reflector 
Staff 4; Student Council 2. 

She holds iter little thoughts in sight, 
Though gay they run and leap- 
She is so circumspect and right: 
She has her soul to keep. 

WILLIAM A. MORSE 

'Bill" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Band 1: Intramural Basketball 2. 3: Home Room 
Messenger 2. 

'Tis not what man does -which exalts him. 
but what man would do. 

• • • 75 



ALBERT MULLEN 

"Al" 

Weymouth Heights General Course 

Junior Decorating Committee 3: Track 3, t; 
Class Banquet Committee, 4. 

He blushes, all is well. 



MARY M. MURPHY 

"Murph" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Glee Club 1. 2; Spanish Club j: Volleyball 1; 
Gregg 1 r inscription Certificate for eight} words 
a minute 4. 

A Utile nonsense does no harm. 



ROBERT G. MULLEN 

"Bob" "Moony" 
Weymouth Heights General Course 
Gym Exhibition 2; Lunchroom Duty 2, 3; 
Student Council 1. 2. 

And all I ask is a merry yarn from a felloiu 
rover, 

And quiet sleep, and a sweet dream, when the 
long trick's over. 



SUMNER H. MULLEN 

"Sum" 

Weymouth Landing General Course 
Debating Club 3. 1; Science Club 4. 

Let every man be master of his time 
Till seven at night. 



M. ELIZABETH MYLES 

"Bette" 

Weymouth Heights Classical Course 
Junior Part) Decorating Committee 3; Class 
Prophecy 4; Usher at Operetta 3; Tennis 1. 
Ind seems to walk on wings and tread on air. 



ANNA L. NASH 

"Nashie" 

South We) mouth Business Course 
Home Room Messenger 1, 2, 4: French Club 3; 
Glee Club 1, 2: Senior Christmas Party Enter- 
tainment 4; Gym Exhibition 1, 2; Operetta 1, 2; 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 4; Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for eighty words a 
minute 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 
100 words a minute 4. 

There is mischief in her eye. 



JOHN E. MULLIGAN 

"Moose" 

East Weymouth General Course 

Baseball 2 4; Football 2. 3, 4. 

You come late, yet you come. 



DAVID G. MURLEY 

"Dave" 

Weymouth General Course 

Home Room Messenger 1 ; Christmas Party 
Entertainment; Basketball (Intramural) 1, 2; 
Gym Exhibition 1, 2; Lunchroom Duty 1; 
Student Council 1 . 

He was a gentleman from sole to crown. 



CONSTANCE V. NELSON 

"Connie" "Nellie" 
East Weymouth Classical Course 

Home Room Messenger 1; Christmas Party 
Committee 4; Usher at Operetta 4: Graduation 
Reception Committee, 4. 

Those about her 
F)om her shall read the perfect ivays of honor. 



NANCY A. NESS 

"Nance" 

South Weymouth General Course 
Glee Club 1; Class Will Committee 4. 

For a long life be moderate in all tilings, 
But don't miss anything. 



JOSEPH P. MURPHY 

"Joe" "Pat" 
North We\ mouth Technical Course 

Book Club 4; Radio Club 3: Class Prophecy 
Committee j: Football 2, 3; Wrestling 4. 
A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance. 



MORTON NESSON 

"Morty" 

East Weymouth Classical Course 
Glee Club 1, 2; Operetta 1; Class Clothing 
Committee. 4. 

He hath as many tricks as a dancing bear. 



77 



CHARLES E. NEWCOMB 

"Charlie" 

South Weymouth Agricultural Course 
Gym Exhibition i; Judging 1, 2, 3, 4; Christmas 
Party Entertainment 4. 

The bowstring of his spirit is not slack. 



HAROLD A. NEWCOMB 

"Teen" 

South We\ mouth Business Course 

The smile that won't come off. 



JUNE A. NEWCOMB 
East \Ve\ mouth Business Course 

Class Dues Collector 1: Book Club 3; Class 
I'rophecv Committee 4; Baseball 3; Basketball 
2. 3: Field Hockev 1: Volleyball 1. 2. 3: Gym 
Exhibition 1. 2: Operetta 3; Gregg Shorthand 
Theory Certificate 4; Gregg Transcription Cer- 
tificate for eight\ words a minute. 
Howe'er it be, it seems to me, 
'Tis only noble to be good. 



ELENA L. C. NOCERA 

"Chickie" "Ellie" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

4-H Club 1: Gym Exhibition 1; Lunchroom 
Dut} 3. 1: Waitress at Reflector Banquet 3, 4. 
Girls blush, sometimes, because they are alive. 



EDWARD G. O'BRIEN 

"O'Bie" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Junior Decorating Committee 3; Intramural 
Basketball 2, 3; Track 3; Lunchroom Duty 4. 
An honest man's word is as good as his bond. 



MARGARET M. O'CONNOR 

"Mig" "Miggie" 
South We\ mouth Business Course- 

Basketball 3: Volleyball 3. 

She laughs at the drop of a pin. 



EDWARD F. O'LEARY 

"Ed" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Home Room Messenger 2: Junior Decorating 
Committee 3; Who's Who Committee 1; Intra- 
mural Basketball 2, 3: Track \. 
There is great ability in knowing how to 
conceal one's ability. 



ELEANOR P. O'LEARY 

"Irish" 

East Weymouth Business Couise 

Freshman-Senior Party Entertainment 1; Field 
Hockey 1; Gym Exhibition 1, 2; Reflector Stall 
Entertainment 1, 2; Operetta 1, 3; Usher at 
Operetta 4; Class Banquet Committee, 4. 
Her pleasure is her power to char/n. 

ROBERT C. OLIVE 

"Hob" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 
Home Room Messenger 1: Junior Party Com- 
mittee 3; Senior Christmas Party Committee 4; 
Junior Outing Committee 3; Senior Dance 
Committee 4: Wrestling 3. 4: Manager 4; Student 
Council Assistant 3; Reflector Stall Entertain- 
ment 4; Senior Play, \. 

He had a head to contrive, a tongue to persuade. 
And a hand to execute any mischief. 



DOROTHY E. PAGE 

"Dot" 

East Weymouth Classical Couise 

Book Club 4; Junior Decorating Committee 
3; Indoor Baseball 1. 2; Basketball 1. 2; Captain 
2; Field Hockev 1; Volleyball 1. 2; Gun Ex- 
hibition 1.2. 

My thoughts are my companions. 



CATHERINE A. PANORA 

"Pinky" 

North Weymouth Business Couise 

4-H Club l. 3: Basketball 1. 2. 

Oh, call it by some belter name, 
For friendship sounds too cold. 



ESTELLE PARSONS 

"Shorty" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

1-H Club 1: Glee Club 1. 2. 3; Student Council 
3: Lunchroom Duty 3; Gym Exhibition 1. 2: 
Cand) Girl at Operetta 3. \: Gregg Shorthand 
Theory Certificate 3. 

She can put two and two together. 



SELINA R. PARSONS 
South Weymouth Business Course 
Home Room Messenger 4; Gills' Glee Club 1. 
2. 3, 4: Operetta 1. 2, 3, 4; Gregg Shorthand 
Transcription Certificate for eighty words a 
minute. 

Fair words never hurt the tongue. 



PRISCILLA PICARD 

"Prissy" 

Weymouth 1. an. ling Business Course 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 3: Gregg 
Transcription Certificate lot 100 words a min- 
ute 4. 

There's a modesty about iter that makes one 
wish to know her better. 



JAMES T. PEARCE 

"Jim" 

South Weymouth Technical Course 
Class Nominating Committee 3; Class Will 
Committee 4: Football 1, 3, (: Junior Party 
Committee 3: Lunchroom Dtitv 2; Student 
Council 2; Wrestling 2, 3. 4; Senior Play, 4. 
Is this that haughty, gallant, gay Lothario? 



DORIS L. PIKE 

"Pikey" "Dot" 
Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 3: Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for eighty words ,1 
minute 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 
100 worcis a minute 4; Home Room Spelling 
Bee Champion 2. 

A willing heart finds nothing impossible. 



MARIE C. PECORARO 

"Pecky" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 4. 

And join with thee calm Peace and Quiet. 



ROSE M. PIZZI 

"Rosie '' 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Gym Exhibition 1; Gregg Shorthand Theory 
Certificate 4. 

She thinks the most good and sfeaks the least 
ill of her neighbors. 



RALPH S. PETERS, JR. 

"Pete" 

North Weymouth Business Course 

Class Nominating Committee \: Football 3, 4: 
Track 4: Lunchroom Duty 2; Student Council 
2; Graduation Reception Committee , 4. 

He fills the air around with laughter. 



LOIS A. PETTEE 

"Lo" 

Weymouth Landing Classical Course 
Class Dues Collector 3. : Home Room Messenger 
2: Class History Committee 4: Basketball 1, 2; 
Field Hockev 1; Volleyball 2; Gym Exhibition 
1. 2; Musical Revue 1; Home Room Spelling 
Bee Champion 3, 4: Senior Play, j; Assistant 
Editor of Student Council Handbook, 3. 
She speaks softly and smiles sweetly. 



JOHN H. PFLAUMER, JR. 

"Johnny" "Jack" 
\\'e\ mouth Landing General Course 
He thinks too much: he talks too little. 



EVELYN L. PLUMMER 

"Evie" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
A true friend is ever a friend. 

PRUDENCE A. POMARICO 

"Prudy" 

East Weymouth Home Economics Course 
Basketball 1, 2; Volley ball 1, 2: Lunchroom 
Duty 1, 2, 3, 4; Waitress at Reflector Supper 3, 4; 
Senior Play 4. 
Cookery has become an art, a noble science. 



GLORIA S. PORTER 

"Glo" 

Fast Weymouth Business Course 

Home Room Messenger r; Book Club 4: Glee 
Club 1; Junior Nominating Committee 3; Class 
Prophecy Committee 4; Field Hockey 1: Volley- 
ball 1, 2, 3; Gym Exhibition 1, 2: Baseball 1. 2. 
3; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Musical Revue 1; Usher 
at Operetta 3; Gregg Shorthand Theory Cert- 
ificate 3: Gregg Shorthand Transcription for 80 
words a minute 4; Gregg Shorthand Transcrip- 
tion for 100 words a minute 4; Christmas Party 
Entertainment \: Usher at Senior Play 4. 
The will to do, the soul to date. 



8l 



KENNETH W. RALPH 

"Ken" 

South Weymouth Technical Course 
[unior Party Committee 3; Class Will Com- 
mittee Chairman 4; Football j.; Wrestling 2, 3; 
Gym Team 2; Lunchroom Duty 2; Student 
Council 2, 3. 

Thinking is but an idle waste of though!. 



GLADYS E. RAYMOND 

"Gladdie" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Glee Club 1; Junior Party Decorating Com- 
mittee 3: Senior Prom Committee; Basketball i; 
Volleyball 1; Usher at Operetta 2, 3; Senior 
Dance Committee 4. 

Always doing, never done, 
Be it mischief, work, or fun. 



MAR J OR IE C. R.OWELL 

"Margie" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Home Room Messenger 3; Candy Girl at Oper- 
etta 3; Gregg Shorthand I heory Certificate 3; 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for eighty words 
a minute 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 100 words a minute 4; Class Clothing Com- 
mittee 4. 

Of all the heavenly gifts thai mortal men 
commend, 

What trusty treasure in the world can counter- 
vail a friend? 



DORIS RUDOLPH 

"Rudy" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, '5. \: Volleyball 

1, 2, 3- 4- 

A smile in her eyes. 



FLORENCE M. RICHARDS 

"Flossie" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 

Basketball t. 

She who says nothing does not commit 
herself. 



JOAN L. RIEKER 

"Joanie" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Who's Who Committee 4: Gregg Shorthand 
Theor) Certificate 3; Gregg Shorthand Trans- 
cription Certificate for eighty words a minute |. 
loan's attractive, tall, and slim. 

And always looks so neat anil trim. 



WALTER C. ROBERTS, JR. 

"Carl" 

Weymouth Landnig Classical Coursee 
Baseball 3; Gym Exhibition 2. 

He is a -wise man who speaks little. 



MARJORIE E. RUEL 

'"Margie" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Glee Club 2. 3. \: Operetta 4: Gregg Short- 
hand Theory Certificate 4; Gregg Transcrip- 
tion Certificate for So words a minute \: Gregg 
rranscription Certificate for 100 words a min- 
ute 4; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1. 
Graduation Reception Committee 4. 

And re hen a lady's in the case, 

You know all other things gix'e place. 

GEORGE RUGMAN 

"Ruggy" 

South Weymouth Agricultural Course 
Vo-agricultural poultry judging 2. 

We grant, although he has much wit, 
He was very shy of using it. 



ALAN \\ SAMPSON 

"Sam" "Sammie" 
\Ve\mouth Heights T echnical Course 
Class Vice President 3, 4: Junior Decorating 
Committee 3; Junior Party Committee 3; Class 
Nominating Committee 3; Class Outing Com- 
ittee 3; Basketball 2; Football 2, 3. 1; Track 
2. 3. 4: Lunchroom Duly 3; Usher at Grad- 
uation 3. 

A scholar, an athlete, and a true friend. 



EDITH ROWELL 

"Edie" 

Weymouth Landing Classical Course 
Basketball 1; Baseball 1; Reflector Staff \. 
Her manner quiet and her nature mild. 



C. RUTH SAN 1 RV 

" Ruthie" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 
Basketball 1; Class Motto Committee (. 

Above the vulgar flight of common souls. 



83 



PAUL W. SAVERY 

"Pat" "Pablo" 
Weymouth Landing General Course 
Baseball 1, 2: Basketball, Intramural 1, 2, 3; 
Cross Country 4; Wrestling 3, 4. 

Happy the man, and happy he alone, 
He who can call to-day his own. 



EILEEN A. SLANEY 

"Elaine" "Leen" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Rook Club 1; Gym Exhibition 1, 2; Glee Club 
1, 2, 3. 4; Operetta i" Christmas Party Com- 
mittee 4. 

Cool, calm, collected. 



JAMES SCULLY 

"Jim" "Jimmy" 
North Weymouth General Course 
Christmas Party Entertainment 4; Class Ban- 
quet Committee 4. 

A man that blushes is not quite a brute. 



EILEEN M. SLATTERY 

East Weymouth Business Coursee 

Basketball 1, 2: Outing Committee 3: Class 
Party 3: Reflector Staff 4; Class Prophecy 4; 
Junior High Office 4. 

Merry as the day is long. 



FLORENCE E. SHAW 

"Flo" "Flossie" 
East Weymouth Classical Course 

4-H Club 2: Basketball 1: Captain 2; Baseball 
r, 2; Gym Exhibition 1, 2; Class Banquet Com- 
mittee 4; Candy Girl at Operetta 4. 

Life is not life without delight. 



FREDERICK A. SLATTERY 

"Fred" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Class President 3, 4; Junior Decorating 3; Junior 
Party Committee 3; Class Outing Committee 3 
Baseball 1, 2, 3; Capt., 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4, 
Capt.; Football 2, 3, 4; Usher at Graduation 3. 
Write me as one who loves his fellow men. 



MOSES SHERMAN 

"Moe" 

North Weymouth General Course 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4: Intramural Basketball 1, 2. 3, 4; 
Cross Country 1, 2. 3, 4; Class Clothing Com- 
mittee, 4. 

Solitude is sometimes the best society. 



CHARLOTTE D. SMITH 

"Smitty" 

East Wevmouth Classical Course 

Candy Girl at Operetta 4; Home Room Spelling 
Bee Champion 3. 

Her voice was ever soft, 
Gentle and low— an excellent thing in a woman. 



MARY R. SHEEHY 

"Mayrose" "Rosie" 
East Weymouth Classical Course 

Glee Clul) 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Decorating Com- 
mittee 3: Junior Nominating Committee 3; 
Basketball i, 2; Track 1; Gym Exhibition 1, 2; 
Operetta 1; Senior Play 4. 

The woman that deliberates is lost. 



MERLE F. SILVA 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Band 1, 2, 3, 4. 

He is wise who speaks little. 



PAUL SMITH 

"Smitty "Pablo" 
East Weymouth Classical Course 

Basketball, Intramural, 1, 2. 3, 4; Basketball 
Manager 3, 4: Track 1.2, [; Wrestling 1. 2. 

Oh, why 

Should life all labour be? 



BARBARA S. STANLEY 

"Barbie" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Class Dues Collector 3, 4; Glee Club 3, 4; 
Junior Decorating Committee 3; Junior Party 
Committee 3; Operetta 3, 4. 

As good be out of the ivorld as out of the 
fashion. 



PORTIA R. STANTON 

"Port" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Home Room Messenger r; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Secretary 4; Girls' Glee Club pianist 1, Junior 
Decoration Committee 3: Junior Outing Com 
mittee 3: Class Prophecy Committee 4; Cheer- 
leader 3, 4; Operetta 1. 2, 3, 4; Student Council 
1. 2. 3, 4: Lunchroom Duty 1, 2. 3, 4; Gregg 
Shorthand Theory Certificate 3; Gregg Tran- 
scription Certificate for 100 words a minute 4; 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 4; 
Graduation Reception Committee, 4. 
The music in my heart I bore, 
Long after it was heard no more. 



DOLORES M. SYBER I S 

North Weymouth Classical Course 
her tongue is the law of kindness. 



LEA TACCONELL1 

"Lee" 

East Weymouth Classical Course 
Four Year Honor Roll: French Club .'i. 4; Book 
Club 4: Reflector Stall 2. 3. 4; Candy Gill al 
Teacher's Flay 4; Senior Flay, 4. 

Silence that spoke and eloquence of eyes. 



LOUISE P. STARR ATT 
South Weymouth Business Course 

Spanish Club 4; Baseball 2; Basketball 1. 2; 
Field Hockey 1; Volleyball 2; Gregg Shorthand 
Theory Certificate 3: Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for eighty words a minute 4; Style 
Show 1. 

Efficiency is the key to success. 



SADIE TETEZIAN 

East Weymouth Classical Course 

Home Room Messenger 2; 4-H Club 1; Class 
Banquet 3; Basketball 1; Gym Exhibition 1, 2. 

She's the mirror of sincerity. 



MURIEL STEELE 

South We\ mouth Business Course 

Honor Roll 1; Home Room Messenger 1; Glee 
Club 1; Musical Re\ue 1; Christmas Party 
Entertainment 4: Class Prophecy 4; Basketball 
1, 2; Vocational School Office 4. 

My heart is as true as Steele. 



ROBERT I HIBEAULT 

"Bob" "Red" 
South Weymouth General Course 
Easy come, easy go. 



DOROTHY E. SULLIVAN 

"Sully" "Dottie" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Book Club 4: Secretary 4-H Handcraft Club 
2: 4-H Exhibition 2: Volleyball -'. 

A never changing smile, 
A never-tiring friend. 



HELEN THOMAS 
South Weymouth Business Course 

Honor Roll 1, 2;, Glee Club 1; Operetta 1: 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 3; eighty 
words a minute Transcription Certificate 4. 
Soft peace she brings, wherever she arrives. 



MARY E. SULLIVAN 

"Sully" 

North Weymouth Business Course 

Basketball 2; Baseball 2: Field Hockey 1: 
Volleyball 2. 

Silence is the perfectest herald of joy. 

PATRICIA SULLIVAN 

"Pat" 

Weymouth Landing General Course 
Honor Roll 3; Book Club 1, 2, 3; Class Outing 
Committee, 4. 

It's good to be merry and wise. 



ALERED C. THOMPSON 

"Tommy" "Al" "Willie" 

South Weymouth Technical Course 
Four Year Honor Roll: Band 3. 4; (.lee Club 1: 
Science Club [; Class Prophecj Commh.ee 4: 
Wrestling 4; Operetta 1: Home Room Spelling 
Bee Champion 1, 2, 3: Grade Spelling Bee 
Champion 2; Senior Flay, 4. 

/ do not knoic beneath -what sky 
Nor on what sen shall be thy fate; 
I only know il shall be high. 
I only know il shall be great. 



87 



JESSIE THOMPSON 

"Jay" "Jess" 
North Weymouth Business Course 

Gregg Shorthand Theon Certificate 3: Christmas 
Party Entertainment 4; Who's Who Committee 
4: Gregg Transcription Certificate 4. 

We that live to please must please to live. 

EDNA TIGHE 

"Teddie" 

South W'evmouth Business Course 

Basketball i, 2: Field Hockey 1; Glee Club 
1. 2. 3. 

The only way to have a friend is to be one, 

DONALD F. TILDEN 

"Tilly" 

East Weymouth General Course 

Class Dues Collector 3, 4: Junior Decorating 
Committee 3; Baseball 2, Track 2. 

A man so various, that he seem'd to be 
Not one, but all mankind's epitome- 

WINIFRED E. TITUS 

"Winnie" 

South Weymouth Home Economics Course 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Lunchroom Duty 2, 3, 4; 
Volleyball 1, 2; Basketball 1.2; Baseball 2; Gym 
Exhibition 1, 2; Opeietta 2, 4: Waitress at 
Harvest Supper 4: Waitress at Newspaper 
l eague Banquet 3. 
Forever smiling, always on the go, 
From her blithe spirit, happiness doth flow. 



DOROTHY E. TORRESSEN 

"Dot" 

North Weymouth Business Course 

Girls' Gym Exhibition 1; Girls' Glee Club 1; 
Student Council Assistant 2, 3; Lunchroom 
Duty 2. 3; Gregg Theory Certificate 3: Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for eighty words a 
minute 4: Class Nominating Committee 4; 
Christmas Party Entertainment 4; Class Clothing 
Committee, 4. 

Gay, good nature sparkles in her eyes. 



WENDELL TOTMAN 

"Tot" "Rich" 
East W'evmouth Business Course 

Intramuril Basketball 4; Football 2. 3; Track 
2, 3, 4; Lunchroom Duty 3, 4; Usher at Grad- 
uation 3; Christmas Party Entertainment 4: 
Junior I ecorating Committee 3; Senior Prom 
Dance Committee, 4; Graduation Reception 
Committee Chairman, 4. 

A little nonsense now and then is relished by 
the best of men. 



FRIEDA L. TRUSSELL 

"Trudy" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

The great pleasure in life is doing 
what people say you cannot do. 



JOSEPH C. TUCCI 

"Joe" 

East Weymouth Business 
Junior Party Committee 3; Football 3, 4; 
Wrestling 1. 2, 3, 4; Capt. 3, 4: Lunchroom 
Duty 3, 4; Usher at Graduation 3; Track 3, 4; 
Student Council 3, 4; Gym Exhibition 2, 3; 
Better late than never, but better never late. 



M. RITA TURNER 

"Penny" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Baseball 2, 3; Basketball 2, 3; Field Hockey 
1; Volleyball 3; Gregg Shorthand Theory 
Certificate 3; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for eighty words a minute 4. 
Her air, her manners, all who saw admired. 



CHRISTINE D. VARTANIAN 

"Chris" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Chess Club 2; 4-H Garden Club 4; Who's Who 
Committee 4; Christmas Party Entertainment 4; 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 4. 

So joyously, 
So maidenly, 
So womanly— her demeanor! 



JOHN D. VAUGHAN 

"Arkic" "Johnny" 
North Weymouth General Course 
Senior Dance Committee 4; Track 2; Wrestling 
1. 2. 3, 4 Co-Captain 4: Gym Exhibition 2, 3, 4; 
Senior Dance Committee 4. 

Where ignorance is bliss, 
'Tis folly to be luise. 



CARL YOIGT 
Weymouth Agricultural Course 

Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1. 
Always in haste, never in a hurry. 



CONSTANCE WADDELL 

"Connie" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Gym Exhibition 1: Senior Prom Committee 4: 
Christmas Part) Entertainment 4; Senior Dance 
Committee 4. 

Laugh, and the world laughs with you. 

MARY VIRGINIA WALLACE 

"Babe" 

Weymouth Landing Classical Course 
Honor Roll 1. 2. 3, 4: Home Room Messenger 1, 
2: Valedictorian 4; Debating Club 3; French 
Club 3: Glee Club 2; Secretary 3. 4: Junior Out- 
ing Committee 3; Gym Exhibition 1; Lunch- 
room Dutv 1, 2, 3: Operetta 2; Reflector 2, 3, 
Editor-in-Chief 4; Student Council Assistant 1, 2, 
3: Candy Girl at Teacher's Pla\ 3: Usher at 
Wey mouth High School Alumni Reunion 3; 
Assistant Editor of the Student Council Hand- 
book 3: Honorary Member of the Monday 
Club 4. 

So wise, so young. 

W ESLEY I. W ATSON 

"Wes" 

South Weymouth Technical Course 
Chess Club 1; 4-H Club 1: Wrestling 2, 4; 
Cross Country 4. 

7 he secret of life is in art. 



GEORGE T. WILKINSON 

•'Wilk" "Wilkie" 
North Weymouth General Course 
Junior Decorating Committee 3: Gym Exhibi- 
tion 4; Wrestling 1. \: Class Outing Committee 4. 
Who first invented work, and bound the free 
And holiday-rejoicing spirit down 
To that dry drudery at the desk's dead wood? 



NAOMI P. WILIS 

East Weymouth Practical Arts Course 
Basketball 1, 2: Volleyball 1, 2: Candy. Giil at 
Operetta 1. 2, 4; Waitress at Reflector Banquet 2. 
Like winds in summer sighing, 
Her voice is low and sweet. 



KENNETH V. WOOD 

"Ken" 

East Weymouth Technical Course 
Wrestling 4; Track 4; Class Outing Committee 4. 
mittee 4. 

"Well, you see, it was this way" 



FLORENCE A. WEBBER 

"Flo" "La Belle" 
North Weymouth Classical Course 
Home Room Messenger 3: Book Club 4: Science 
Club 4; Class Nominating Committee 3: Basket- 
ball r, 2: Volleyball 2; Usher at Alumni Banquet 
3- 

Whatever is -worth doing at all is -worth doing 
well. 



MARY F. L. WOODWORTH 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Glee Club 4; Usher at Operetta 4; Gregg 
Theory Certificate 3; Gregg Transcription for 
eighty words a minute 4; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for too words a minute 4. 

// is good to live and learn. 



FRED WHEELER 

'Chick" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Glee Club 3. 4: Operetta 4: Book Club 4; Class 
Outing Committee 4. 

Some think the world is made for fun and frolic, 
And so do I. 



GERTRUDE E. WHITE 

"Gertie" "Gert" "Trudi" 
East Weymouth General Course 

Girls' Glee Club 2; Basketball 2: Track 1; Gym 
Exhibition 2; Lunchroom Duty 3; Student 
Council 3. 

Not very tall, not very small, 

But fair and sweet, and loved by all. 



HAROLD A. WRIGHT 

"Wilbur" 

Weymouth Landing Technical Course 
Science Club t; Class Nominating Committee 3; 

.3. 1; Home Room Spelling Bee Champ- 



I UK k 

ion 1. 



The mind's the standard of the man. 



G. ELLIOTT YETMAN 
South Weymouth Agricultural Course 
Senior Christmas Part) Committee 4. 

Each man reaps on his oxen farm. 



9 l 



GEORGE ZEMIN A 

"Squeak" "Zum" 
Weymouth Landing General Course 
Bo\s' Gym Exhibition 2; Glee Club 4; Football 
3; Track 2, 4; Cross Country 1; Indoor Track 4. 
Although the last, not least. 



AVILIO P. DIGRAVIO 

"Rico" 

East Weymouth Sheet Metal 

Baseball Manager i, 2, 3; Football 2, 3; Class 
1'iophecy. 

School is a place to enjoy yourself. 



JAMES A. BARRETT 

"Bing" 

East Braintree Printing 
Exhibition 1 2. 

He can't stop eating. 



ELWOOD T. DILL 

"Pickle" 

Hingham Auto Repair 

Exhibition 1, 2. Class Prophecy 

The people's choice. 



WILLIAM J. BAULIS 

"Bill" 

East Weymouth Sheet Metal 

Basketball 2, 3; Baseball 2. 

A Workman is known by his work. 



GEORGE W. DUFFNEY, JR. 

"Duff" 

East Weymouth Sheet Metal 

Exhibition 1, 2. 

He is full of joke and jest. 



RALPH G. BOWLES 

"Ralphie" JAMES O. FADER 

Rockland Auto Repair ■■Jimmy" 

Exhibition 1. 2. Abington Auto Repair 

"Merry and Mirthful." Class Prophecy Committee. Exhibition 1, 2. 

The lady killer. 



GUIDO CAVALLO 

"Hoisie" 

East Weymouth Sheet Metal 

Track 3. Football 1, 2, 3. Baseball 2. Exhibition 
1 Secretary-Treasurer. 

We like him as a friend, as an athlete, and as 
a student. 



JOHN W. FRATUS, JR. 

"Porky" 

Hingham Sheet Metal 

Exhibition 1, 2. 

Never let school stand in the way of pleasure. 



DOMINIC P. CONSENTINO 

"Coke" 

East Weymouth Printing 
Exhibition 1. Basketball 1. 

Small but powerful. 



EUGENE W. GARRITY 

"Gene" 

North Weymouth Printing 
Exhibition 1,2; Basketball 1, 2, 3. 

F.at, drink, and be meny. 



93 



GARLAND H. HAY 

"Gar" 

East Weymouth Printing 
Exhibition i. Wrestling 3. Student Council 
2, 3. Class Prophecy 3. Vice-President 3. 
He'll be his own boss. 



CARL LOVENDALE 

"Carl" 

Lovell's Cornei Cabinetmaking 
Exhibition 1, 2; Scenery for Teacher's Play 2, 3. 

Never worry it doesn't pay- 



LESTER HUTCHINSON JOHN J. MacDONALD 

"Hutchie" "Crudd" 
Exhibition 2. Basketball 2. Baseball 1. Basketball 1, 2, 3. Nominating Com- 

Quietness is a virtue few have. mittee 3, Exhibition 1. 2. 

He's quite a Indies' man. 



VICTOR D. JACOBS 

"Jake" 

Weymouth Landing Cabinetmaking 
Scenery for Operetta 2. 3. Scenery for Teach- 
ers Play 2, 3. Student Council 2. Nominating 
Committee 3. Exhibition 1, 2. 

Work will hurl 1111 man. 



HOWARD R. MAXWELL 

"Mac" 

North Weymouth Sheet Metal 

Baseball 1. 2; Basketball 1. 2, 3. 

A ivilling heart finds nothing impossible. 



ROLAND H. JASMIN 

"Roily" 

Lovell's Cornei Cabinetmaking 
Exhibition 1. 2: Scener\ for Operetta 2.3: Scen- 
er\ for Teacher's Pla\ 2. 3; Student Council 2. 
Baseball 1. Who's Who Committee 3. 

A good pal is never forgotten. 



KENNETH E. McNAMARA 

"Mac" 

North Weymouth Printing 
Exhibition 2. 

A good friend indeed. 



PETER R. LeMOTTE 

"Pete" 

Rockland Auto Repaii 

Basketball 2. 3. Baseball 2 Christmas Party 3. 
Senior Prom Committee 3. 

Can be found where dancers assemble. 



EVERETT W. NAUHA 

"Ev" 

Bingham Auto Repair 

Exhibition 1, 2. 

His motto is, "Slow, bul sure." 



GEORGE F. LINEHAN 

"Red" 

West Hingham Printing 
Exhibition 1, 2. Baseball 1. 

One day he shall have his way. 



GEORGE E. NORWOOD 

"Gene" 

Lovell's Corner Sheet Metal 

Reflector Stair 3; Exhibition 1. 2: Who's who 
A good spoil and a friend in deed. 



■ ■ <> 



PAUL F. OLSON 

"String" 

East BraiiUree Printing 
Exhibition 1, 2. 

A mighty oak from a tiny acorn grew. 



RUSSELL P>. SAVORY 

"Russ" 

Weymouth Landing Printing 
Baseball 1. Exhibition 1, 2. 

His own shop is his goal. 



HOMER S. OS 1 LUND 



Wollaston 



"Spence. 
He's a real pal. 



Printing 



LEONARD O. PEASLEE 

"Lenny" 

Wevnioutli Landing Auto Repair 

Baseball 1. Basketball 1, 2. 

He seems quiet, but look out. 



SEBASTIAN M. RUBBO 

"Sabby" 

East Weymouth Auto Repair 

Exhibition 1, 2. Nominating Committee 3. Senior 
Prom 3. 

"Although his work is the best 
It does not hinder his jest. 



JOSEPH P. SCIACCA 

"Joe" 

Pembroke Printing 
Baseball 1, 2. Reflector Staff 3. Class Will 3. 
Exhibition 2, 3; Alumni Reunion Entertain- 
ment 3; Award Winner in the International 
Printing Ink Essay Contest 2; Senior Class 
Play 3; 

He's ns smart as they come. 



GERALD F. SHEPPARD 

"Gerry" 

East Weymouth Sheet Metal 

Student Council 1. 2. 3. Exhibition 1, 2. Class 
W 7 ill 3. Basketball Manager 2, 3. 

To try is to succeed. 



JOHN F. SHERMAN 

"Sherm" 

Hingham Sheet Metal 

Class History 3. 

He never makes any noise! Oh, yeah? 



* • • 97 



LEO SKEFFINGTON 




HAROLD THl'RSTON 



OI IM R SMITH 



OLIVER VIRTA 



ROIU R I 1 VSSIN \R\ 



\R I 111 R WRK.II I 



LEO J . Ski l l INC 1 ON 

"Skef 

East Weymouth Printing 
Baseball 1, a, 3. 

A pal worthwhile. 

OLIVER C. SMITH, JR. 

"Smilty" 

Lovells Corner Sheet Metal 

Basketball 2. 3. Class History 3. Exhibition 1, 
Quite the boy. 



HAROLD J. THURSTON, JR. 

East Weymouth Auto Repair 

Class Will 3, Exhibition i, 2. 

A small man with a lot of ambition. 

OLIVER T. VIRTA 

"Gt«" 

Lovell s Corner Auto Repair 

Exhibition 2. Baseball i, 2. Basketball 1, 2, 3. 
President 3. Student Council 3 
A good worker, a better sport, and yet a belter 
friend. 



ROBERT R. TASSINARY 

"Bob" 

Braintree Printing 
Basketball 1. Christmas Party 3. Exhibition 1, 
Tliey don't come any better. 



ARTHUR C. W RIGHT 

"Art" 

East Weymouth Auto Repair 

Basketball 1. Exhibition 2. 

Here is the man you want, girls. 
It's good to be honest and true. 



98 . . 



First Row: Ann Gardner. Mary Curry, Doris Kincaide. Mary V. Wallace. Mr. Brown. Robert Coleman. 
Nancy Fielding, Priscilla Dunn. Dorothy Wells, Jean Condon; Second Row: Dorothy Condrick, Ruth Dondero, 
Eleanor Bates. Shirley Hart, Constance O'Neil, Doris Barnes, Carolyn Stone. Doris O'Connor, Edwina 
Barnes, Helen Fuller, Jane Connell; Third Row: Jean Morrison, Edith Rowell. Helen Cromwell, Marilyn 
Nickerson. Marjorie Leonard. Margaret Donahue. Marie Crowley, Mary Hayes, Pearl Lipsky, Sylvia Steele, 
Virginia Collins; Fourth Row: Helen Crawford, Muriel lilackwell, Alice Toomey, Florence Dustins, Joseph 
Sciacca, Kirby Weathersby, Robert Walsh, Louise Jannell. Barbara Batchelder, Natalie Kosarick, Virginia 
Garrity; Fifth Row: Marjorie Mooney, Eileen Johnson. Louise Doane, Lea Tacconelli. 



Reflector Staff 

Thf Reflector staff has completed a most enjoyable year in publishing its 
school paper. Five issues, the Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine, and April 
issues, and the Year Book were printed in the Weymouth Vocational School. 
May we express our deepest thanks to Mr. Harry Duncan, in charge of the print- 
ing department. Only through his untiring efforts and consideration have we 
been able to publish the Reflector. Our faculty adviser, Mr. Prescott Brown, has 
devoted his time and efforts for our benefit, and we are all deeply grateful. Mr. 
Brown's helpful supervision has proved an invaluable aid to all students who 
have come under his direction. 

Again the Reflector has received mention in the 1938-39 judging of school 
publications by the Southeastern Massachusetts League of School Publications. 
In January, Weymouth High entertained the various schools of the League. The 
meetings of the League this year have been held at Middleboro, Holbrook, and 
Duxbury. 

We hope that you have enjoyed our magazine, and we wish to thank the 
student body for their co-operation. To the incoming staff we extend our best 
wishes for a successful year. 



100 . 




First Row: Stella Parsons, Phyllis MacDonald. Florence Minasian, Grace Jones; Second Row: Robert 
Raymond, Eugene Young, Gus Spurr, Charles Galligan, Walter Kosarick, Robert Sargent, George Gloster; 
Third Row : Sidney Gilman, John Hoffman. 



Orchestra 

The Weymouth High School Orchestra under the direction of James W. Cal- 
derwood has completed a busy season this year. They played at a Monday 
Club meeting and for the Monday Club Play. The Old Colony Club also 
had the pleasure of their assistance at their play. 

Within the school they have created a musical background for the Teachers* 
Play and the Operetta. 



I o i 



Operetta 



The Weymouth High School Glee Club, under the excellent supervision of 
Mr. John Lyons and his assistants, presented ibis Near the famous comic 
opera, "The Mikado," written by the English composers, Gilbert and Sulli- 
van. 

The story takes place in Titipu, a little old fashioned village of Japan. 
The characters were as follows: 

The Mikado 

Nanki-Poo, his son 

Yum-Yum, Ko-Ko's ward 

Ko-Ko, Lord High Executioner 

Poo-Bah, Lord High Everything Else 

Pish-Tush, Xoble Lord 

Peep-Bo, Yum-Yum's sister 

Peep-Bo, Yum-Yum's sister 

Katisha, rejected love of Nanki-Poo 

The students who took these leading roles deserve to be highly praised for 
their work. The smaller roles and the chorus helped to make the production a 
great success. 

The Weymouth High School Orchestra, under the leadership of Mr. James W. 
Calderwood, provided the music for the play. 

The teachers and students all deserve to be commended for their splendid help 
and co-operation in making this year's play as great a success as those offered 
in past years by the Weymouth High School Glee Club. 



Clarence Burrill 
William Sewell 
Portia Stanton 
Waller Easttey 
Dana Peaslee 
Gustave Sjjinr 
Betty Faliey 
Martha Gerrior 
Doris Goodivin 



102 




First Row: Prudence Pomarico. Charlotte MacLeod, Cynthia Cowing, Lois Pettee, Lea Taccon«|lli; Second 
Row: Charles MacNutt, James Pearce, Alton Blanchard, Charles Cavanagh, Roi)ert Olive, Thomas Lyons, 
Jr.; Third Row: Joeseph Sciacca, Alfred Thompson. 



Senior Play 



On May 17, 1940, under the direction of Mrs. McGrath, the members of the 
Senior class presented the play, "Tovarich," a delightful corned) by Jacques 
Deval. In a Parisian garret, a former general of Cossack cavalry and his 
wife, a Grand Duchess, are making a gay go of rags and starvation. In the Banque 
de France they have stowed away 4,000,000,000 francs, entrusted to them by the 
late Czar to be used for Russia's good. They secure positions with the family 
of a bourgeous banker, Monsieur Dupont. Their identities are secret until a 
Soviet commissar turns up among the guests, and recognizes them. The Soviet 
has been making every effort to take that fortune from them. It is left to the 
hated commissar to win the billions away with words. 

The part of the Grand Duchess was played with great understanding and 
charm by Cynthia Cowing. Charles Cavanagh, the exiled prince, delighted the 
audience by his humor. Monsieur Dupont, the banker, was portrayed vigorously 
and entertainingly by Charles MacNutt. The supporting players handled their 
parts excellently. 

THE CAST 



Prince Mikail Alexandrovitch Ouratieff 

Charles Cavanagh 
Grand Duchess Tatiana Petrovna 

Cynthia E. Cowing 

Count Feodor Brekenski 
Olga 

Chauffourier-Dubieff 
Martelleau 
Fernande Dupont 
Charles Dupont 



James Pearce 
Charlotte MacLeod 
Joseph Mercurio 
Alfred Thompson 
Lois Pettee 
Charles MacSutt 



Louise 

Georges Dupont 
Helene Dupont 
Concierge 

Madame Van Hemert 



Prudence Pomarico 
Robert Olive 
Lorraine Cowett 
Thomas Lyons 
Lea Tacconelli 



Madame Chauffoui ier-Dubiefl 

Mary Rose Shcchx 
Commisar Gorotchenko Alton Blanchard 

Musicians: Joseph Sciacca Richard Jordan 
Robert Dahlstrom Charles Gilligaii 



First Row: Louise Jannell, Sylvia Steele, Ruth Stub. Pearl Lipsky, Helen Fuller, Elaine Clapp, Catherine 
Anderson, {Catherine McAleer; Second Row: Ronald Pierce, Jahn Hraker, Garland Hay, John MacDougall, 
Kenneth Chubbuck, Thomas Dutson; Third Row: William Carmichael, John Delorey, Al Bakish, Gerald 
Sheppard. 



Student Council 

The Student Council of Weymouth High consists of the regular members 
voted upon by the students of Weymouth High and the assistant members 
who are elected from each home room. The officers of 1939-40 are: 
John Delorey, President 
Alfonse Bakish, Vice-President 
Ruth Stub, Secretary 

The duty of the Student Council members is to keep order throughout the 
school, in the lunchroom, on the school grounds, and in the corridors. By having 
an efficient Student Council body, Weymouth High is able to have a well devel- 
oped system of order. 

May our Weymouth High student council prove more successful with each 
succeeding year. 



104 . 



Band 

The Band was present at all the football games this year, both at home and 
in other towns. At these games the band formed the letters of both home 
and opposing teams. 

As part of the Memorial Day exercises in the hall the band played under 
the direction of Mr. Calderwood. The selections were "The Star-Spangled Ban- 
ner," "America," and "God Bless America." 

At the graduation exercises the Senior Class will sing "To Thee O Country" 
and "The Bells of St. Mary's." accompanied by the band. 

Those leaving the band this year wish to extend their thanks and gratitude 
to Mr. Calderwood, the best music master ever. 



105 



First Row: Slattery, Sampson, Captain Gatto, Loring, Nista, Tucci, Bates; Second Row: Assistant Coach 
Jerardi, Consentino, Andersen, Cavallo, Delorey, Coach Arlanson. 



Football 



eymouth had a good football team this year. Captain Mario Gatto had 



some real backing this year. The team first played Belmont and won, 6-6. 



Milton then fell down under the excellent running and passing of Ander- 
son and Delorey. A near riot resulted after the North game, which resulted in 
North's winning 6-7. Brookline lost to Weymouth with the score 6-0. The next 
game with Quincy ended with Quincy on top 15-6. Braintree, Plymouth and 
Whitman also were defeated. The most exciting game of the year was the an- 
nual Hingham game. Weymouth won with the score 6-0. 

The members of the team this year were Captain Gatto, Sampson, Loring, 
Nista, Slattery, Bates, Delorey, Anderson, Cavallo, Mulligan, Ralph, and Kelley. 




106 .. . 



First Row: McCarthy. Gloster, Crossman, Capt. Slattery, MacArthur, Bailey, Breton; Second Row: Manager 
Smith, Clark, Coach Gannon, Ambler, Kelly, Herlihy, Manager. 



|his year's basketball team was not as successful as we wished. The reason 



for this is the large number of games. Weymouth played many extra games 



this season. Victories were scored over Everett, Hingham, Braintree, Ply- 
mouth, Revere, Quincy, Rockland, and Milton. The team piled up a record of 
8 wins and 12 losses. Many of the games lost were heartbreakers. The boys who 
Fitzpatrick, Tommy Kelly, L. Ambler and Red Gloucester. The managers were 
Bailey, Bud Crossman, Cecil Breton, Francis McCarthy, Warren Clark, Junie 
played on the first team are: Captain Fred Slattery, Bob MacArthur, George 
Smith and Herlihy. Fred Slattery, George Bailey, and Bud Crossman were high 
scorers. Mr. Gannon will lose most of his first team this year. Bob MacArthur 
Bud Crossman, Tommy Kelly, Fred Slattery, Cecil Breton, and Francis McCarthy. 



Basketball 




. . . 107 




First Row: E. Quirk. C. Roberts. Second Row: E. Corridan, E. Duncan. K. Loring, G. Delorey, G. Anderson, 
T. Kelley, \V. Desmond; Third Row: Assistant Coach, F. Kelley. G. Gilligan. J. Mulligan, Manager. G. Corey, 
F. Slattery, J. Panetta, Coach, H. Arlanson; Fourth Row: W. Anderson, J. Orcutt, \V. McKinnon, J. Wheeler. 
F. Sheehan. 



Baseball 

The baseDall team, under Harry Arlanson's coaching is having a fairly good 
season. They have a record of 5 defeats, 4 victories. This is not too impres- 
sive, but there are several games yet to be played. 

The team started off rather poorly, losing the first two games to Brockton and 
Braintree. With a sudden reversal of form Weymouth came through with four 
straight vic tories. They first beat North 14 to 3. Quincy, Braintree, and Hing- 
ham also fell under Anderson's and Duncan's pitching. The last three games 
have not proved as successful. The team has been beaten by Whitman, Milton 
and North. All the boys are looking to the future games to improve their record. 

The lineup follows: pitchers: Duncan, "Gump" Anderson, Desmond and 
Corridan; catchers: Slattery, Gifford; first base, Mulligan; second base, "Hop" 
McKinnon and Roberts; third base, Tommy Kelly; short stop, "Rat" Anderson; 
left field, George Delorey; center field, "Chick" Wheeler, and Ken Loring; right 
field, George Gilligan. By graduation the team will lose Anderson, Desmond, 
Duncan, Slattery, Mulligan, Kelly, Loring, and Wheeler. 

108 .. . 



First Row: Gus Hanson. Richard Bailey, William MacAlpine. Joseph MacDonald. John Delory. Tirrell Cook, 
Eugene Johnson; Second Row: Assistant Manager. Francis Heger, Edward O'Leary. Richard Totman, Alan 
Sampson, Captain. Robert Coleman, Moses Sherman, Manager, William Marshman. Coach. Oral Page; Third 
Row: James Clapp, Fred Pierce, Joseph Ouellet, Gerald Proctor. Robert Huer, Malcolm Dudley, Harold 
Wright. William Connell, George Wright; Fourth Row: Kenneth Wood, Donald Jackon, Paul Quinlan, John 
Delorey, Robert Raymond, John Hull, William Striano, Thomas Smith. 



Track 




|he Weymouth indoor track team split the season. Victories were scored over 
Milton and Quincy. Dedham and Tufts beat the team by slight scores. 



In the last few years more boys have turned out for spring track. This 
year Mr. Page had good material from which to choose his team. 

The team" opened the season at Rockland with a victory. Hingham being 
unable to compete with Bob Coleman, Al Sampson, and Moses Sherman, lost 
with the score 50-36. Weymouth then swamped North 48-29. Braintree threat- 
ened to break our record but Weymouth won by the score 41-36. Weymouth 
took the Quincy Sophomores 47 1 />-37 1 /2- The South Shore Meet at Abington saw 
Weymouth taking first place with 4514 points. In the South Shore Meet at Wey- 
mouth, Weymouth took second place. Since there are still some meets to be 
held, the team is looking forward to victories. 

The track team will lose some of its best men by graduation. Among them 
will be Al Sampson, Manning Jannell, Bob Coleman, "Squeak" Zemina, "Rich" 
Totman and Moses Sherman. Mr. Page, however, still has some good material 
for next year. 



.109 



First Row: Murphy. Co-Captain Tucci. Assistant Coach Kelly. Coach Stewart, Co-Captain Vaughan. Consen- 
tino; Second Row: Pecoraro, Scott, Manager Oliver, Drake, Gatto, Lysakowski. 

Wrestling 

Weymouth defeated Cranston, R. [. High School to open the season and 
then went on to defeat Phillips Exeter Acadera) and Phillips Andover 
Academy together with gaining a lie lor the championship of the Old 
Colony League with Quincy. 

In the annual Tufts Tournament, Weymouth successfully defended its 
class A championship and also captured the class B championship this year. 

The following boys were state champions in their respective classes: 



Gaeton Pecoraro no 

John Vaughan, co-captain iiS 

Joseph Tucci, co-captain 145 

James Consentino 165 



Coaches Stewart and Kelley feel that next year's team will earn on the de- 
fence of the titles which they won this year. Next year's team will Ik- captained 
by Arthur Parnaby and Robert Drake both of whom won second place in the 
tournament this year. 



110. 



First Row: Ralph Antonetti, Joseph Lambe, John LaRocco, Timothy Desmond; Second Row Phillip Herlihy, 
Phillip Flynn. 



Golf 

This year, the golf team is fourth in the Norfolk County High School League. 
They have played six games, and still have three more to play, one with 
North Quincy and two with Quincy. Their record up to date is Weymouth 
5I/2, Norwood ^y 2 ; Weymouth o, Canton 9; Weymouth 6 l / 2 , Walpole 2 J / 2 ;'Wey- 
mouth y 2 , Needham 8 y 2 ; W eymouth o, Canton g; and Weymouth 2, Needham 7. 

The players are Joseph Lambe, Phillip Herlihy, Russell Tufts, Girard 
McCarthy, Timothy Desmond, Phillip Flynn, Ralph Antonetti, John LaRocco, 
and Robert Coughlin. 



1 1 1 




First Row: G. Mahoney. K. Swan, R. Grisdale. M. Harrington, R. Bourassa; Second Row: R. Park. F. 
Homeyer. T. Dutson. 



Boys' Tennis 

This year's team was comprised of: 

Richard Grisdale Frank Homeyer 

George Mahoney Richard Park 

Thomas Dutson Matthew Harrington 

Ralph Bourassa 

There was only one veteran from last year's team, so the hoys had to start 
from "scratch" this season. Up to the present they have won no matches, but they 
are getting a wonderful foundation for a future team. They have played six games 
at Braintree, Hingham, Milton, and Quincv. 

Under the guidance of Mr. Bates we feel certain that the boys will come 
out "on top" in the future. 



112 



First Row: Betty Lohnes, Frances Perkins. Captain, Auric Duplin. Jean Blanchard, Shirley McDermott; Second 
Row: Rosemary Hurd, Dorothy Perkins, Edna Fay, Shirley Nickerson, Dorothea Leeming. 



Girls' Sports 

The year of 1939-40 has held many various athletic activities for the girls at 
Weymouth High School. 

The year opened with basketball, with one team composed of Juniors 
and Seniors, another of Sophomores, and still another of Freshmen. The Senior- 
Junior team was victorious in all its games. The Captain of the Senior-Junior 
team was Aurie Duplin; the Captain of the first Sophomore team, Marjorie 
Robert; the Captain of the first Freshman team, Gilda Gatto. 

Alter the basketball season, volley ball was played with equal enthusiasm. 
There were several teams— first and second of the lower classes, and first and sec- 
ond of the upper classes. The Juniors and Seniors came out ahead in these 
»ames. 

Indoor Baseball, as in the past years, proved to be a popular sport. The 
upper class players, because of their past practice were again the winners. 

The girls met in June to participate in a track meet. There was keen compe- 
tition in high jump, broad jump, 50-yard dash and basketball throw. 

With the close of the track season comes also the close of another eventful 
year ai Weymouth High. 



. . . 113 



Girls' Tennis 



The girls still play under their own management. On account of the rainy 
weather they had a late start this year. They were the victors at their first 
game at Scituate with a score of 3-1. At Braintree the score was tie, 2-2. 

The members of the team are: 

Jean Macafee, Manager 
Cynthia Cowing 
Janet Brayshaw 
Pauline Finn 
Helen Thomas 
Eleanor Gould 
June Davison 
Charlotte Evans 
Anna Nash 
Marilyn Anderson 



114 



First Row: E. Kelley. B. Wendt, O. Smith. P. Bates, W. Baulis, D. Herlihy, H. Blakeman, O. Virta; Second 
Row: D. Kelley, A. Smith, H. Maxwell, (i. Sheppard, Manager, Mr. Booth, Coach, E. Garrity, R. Belcher. 
R. Manley. 



Vocational Basketball 

This year the Vocational Basketball squad had another successful season. 
Many aspirants showed up at the first call for practice, making it easy for 
Coach James Booth to pick out a strong team. 

The quintet opened the first game of the season with a victory over Hol- 
brook High, 33-18. The second game was won over Everett Trade by a score 
32-28. Next came the hard fighting N. C. A. S. team from Walpole. Putting up 
a hard fight, we finally won 24-17, making it the third straight victory of the 
season. Quincy Trade came next to Weymouth. By trailing the first half and 
putting up a big rally in the last half, Weymouth again proved victorious. The 
team kept on climbing to victory by defeating Somerville Trade 33-16 and Wal- 
tham twice, first by the score 29-22, the second game 32-30. This ran the score to 
seven consecutive victories. 

Weymouth's first setback came when the old rival, Quincy Trade, piled up 
the score 42-37. Hingham High also proved a little too strong by netting a score 
of 35-22 over Weymouth. 

The season finally ended successfully, when Everett came to Weymouth to 
be defeated by the score 39-35. The final tally showed that Weymouth Trade won 
ten out of its twelve games— a very creditable showing under the capable coaching 
of Mr. James Booth. 

... 115 




First Row: P. LeMotte. \V. Baiilis, Mr. Mahn. coach. P. Bates, A. Williams; Second Row: E. Kelley, G. 
Cavallo, L. Skeffington, H. Blakeman, R. Belcher. H. Peaslee, J. Vanasse; Fourth Row: J. Saferian, 
Assistant Manager, G. Cornell, H. Brennock, W. Bates, B. Ells, A. Digravio, Manager. 



Vocational Baseball 



Oi r team this year has again had a fairly successful season by winning six 
out of nine games. The summary is as follows: 

In the opening game Weymouth claimed victory over Holbrook bv 
the score 10-1. Randolph also bowed to Weymouth in the tenth inning after a 
five-run rally. A much improved Holbrook team took the next game by the 
score 14-9. Quincy also proved victorious by piling up the score of 15-6. Wey- 
mouth got revenge for last year's defeats at the hands of Somerville by winning 
two successive games this year, the score of the first game being 8-5, the second 
14-2. Weymouth again proved to be Randolph's "jinx team" when we took an- 
other hard fought game by the score 4-2. The Cohasset game was played at 
Cohasset, and was lost by Weymouth 10-6. Weymouth won the return game with 
Cohasset by a score of 6-4. 

There are a few games left to pla) this season, but under the capable coach- 
ing of Mr. Otto Mahn, we hope to win these remaining games. 



1 16 



Camera Club 



In February the Wessagusset Camera Club celebrated its third birthday. It was 
organized in February, 1937, by Albert Vinal, its first president. Alter the gradu- 
ation of the original members, the club was reorganized in June, 1939. 

The group went on several outings last summer. In the course of these they 
went out in row boats, got snaps of Admiral Byrd in Boston, took picnic lunches, 
and visited Plymouth, Halifax, Braintree, Cohasset Harbor, Hingham, and 
Nantasket. During the various trips they got some extremely informal and 
amusing shots of each other. 

When school began, naturally our picnics and trips had to be discontinued. We 
decided, however, that we ought to go to every photography lecture or exhibition 
lecture of the Hingham Camera Club. We took pictures in the Herald-Traveler 
building. While we were doing this, we learned something about how a newspaper 
is made. After we had come out of the Herald-Traveler, we went to the East 
Boston airport. Several of the more ambitious members went up in an airplane, 
and took pictures. Last fall, we went into the Massachusetts Institute of Television, 
and not only saw television, but were televised. 

Mr. Francis E. Whipple, Jr., Director of the Trade School, invited us to the 
office of the Flair Magazine, where we experimented with photography, devel- 
oping, printing, and enlarging. Not long ago we went into the Copley Plaza Hotel 
to the Eastman Kodak Company's beautiful display of pictures, photographic 
equipment, and to the accompanying lecture. 

Several well-known local photographers have attended our club meetings. Last 
fall Mr. Harry Duncan of the Trade School gave an interesting talk on color. 
Mr. Francis Whipple showed us some slides he had taken on various trips around 
the country. Mr. Merrick Price of Flair talked on news photography. At each meet- 
ing the members show pictures they have taken. These are examined and critized 
by the other members. 

Recently the Wessagusset Camera Club sponsored a snapshot contest for pupils 
of the Weymouth High School. The award was given to Eugene Garrity for his 
picture, which was printed in a recent issue of the Reflector. 

We have a club mascot, a blue and pink giraffe. The official keeper of the 
mascot is Miss Charlotte MacLeod. "M.Q.", as he is called, makes an excellent 
subject for a still life, and poses good-naturedly whenever requested to do so. 

Membership in the club has always been opened to anyone interested in photo- 
graphy. (Real photographers keep away.) We meet every other Thursday eve- 
ning. The members from the Weymouth High School are: Donald Campbell, pres- 
ident, Lillian Litchfield, secretary-treasurer, Betty Lohnes, publicity director, 
Charlotte MacLeod, official keeper of the Mascot, Howard Shaw, librarian, 
Grace Loud, George Cobbett, Roger Leclair, and our faculty adviser, Mr. John 
T. Ghiorse. 

Betty Lohnes '40 



117 



AUTOGRAPHS 



Dumbest 

Prettiest 

Brainiest 



Huskiest 
Cleverest 
Funniest 



Just Friends — 




8. 

9- 
io. 
11. 

12. 

'3- 



James Daly 
Al Blanchard 
Christine Vartanian 
Eleanor Fish 
Barbara Ambach 
Dot Page 
Gertie White 
Richard Curtis 
Windsor Dm heck 
Jean Morrison 
Alma Houde 
Dorothv Torressen 
Bob Olive 
Jennie Lang 
Pauline House 
Marv Woodworth 



17. Dot Condrick 33. 

18. Betty Lohnes 34. 

19. Vera Daniels 35. 

20. Marjorie Rowell 36. 

21. Eileen Slattery '3-. 

22. Chick Wheeler 38. 

23. Eileen Johnson 39. 

24. Elizabeth Metcalf 40. 

25. Marv Murphy 41. 
2(i. Muriel Courtney 42. 

27. Eleanor McGaw 43. 

28. Esther Crone 

29. Barbara Stanley 44. 

30. Lorraine Holbrook 45. 

31. Doris Pike 46. 

32. Alan Sampson 47. 



Fred Slattery 
Rita Litchfield 
Delores Syberts 
Edward Heinstrom 
Jean Ellis 
Lee Hopkins 
Jimmy Coyle 
Lorraine Cowetti 
Frank Homeyei 
Barbara GrifTin 
Doris and Edwina 
Barnes 

Natalie Kosariek 
Evehn Plummer 
Louise Foley 
Kenneth Wood 



48. 

49- 
50. 

5>- 
52- 
53- 
54- 
55- 
56. 

57- 
5 8. 

59- 
60. 
61. 
62. 
63. 



Lea I acconelli 
Eleanor O'Leary 
"Squeak" Zemina 
Joe Tucci 

M. Virginia Wallace 
Anna Nash 
Louise Starratt 
Marilyn Anderson 
Priscilla Dunn 
Cynthia Cowing 
Rita Darrin 
Florence Webber 
.Mired Thompson 
Pauline Finn 
Belli Havncs 
Annette Ford 

... 121 




64. Jean Matafec 

65. Nano Fielding 

66. Eileen Slaney 

67. Rosemary Hackett 

68. Bill Desmond 

69. Naomi Willis 



122 .. . 



70. Hai 1 \ Ciibson 



72. 
73- 
74- 
75- 



Marie Kelley 
Catherine Covle 
Helen Genchauski 
Audrey Cooke 
Elizabeth Ellard 



76. Virginia Kai 



S2. Wes Watson 



Lan\ Cullivan 83. Constance Nelson 

78. Mary Rose Sheeny 84. Agnes Kinsley 

79. Jimmy Dwyer 85. Mary Austin 

80. Muriel Steele 

81. Dorothv Arsenault 




123 




We, the students of the Senior Class, 

Here publish our will before we pass. 

Just a few suggestions written down, 

And, please, oh, please, don't on us frown. 

From past events of many a year 

We've gleaned experience of both smile and tear. 

A warning to you! Don't follow our plight! 

Let the Freshman Party be a guiding light. 

Now just a few more hints to add: 

juniors consider whether good or bad. 

In many rooms there's one thing lacking— 

A pencil sharpener, for it we're packing. 

To Messrs. Whittle and Lyons, two executives line, 

The best that is in us we leave behind. 

To the wandering Romeos who swarm 212 

We leave Miss Vining to guide them well. 

To those who dw-ell in 215 

Pep, vim, and vigor is what we leave. 

To the peaceful realm of 216 

We leave Miss Canning to rule as queen. 

We leave 217 to Mr. Cleaves, 

So crafty seniors won't skip with ease. 

To 218, which seems all right. 

We leave a map that will please Mrs. White. 

To the future cherubs of 301 

We leave the dark secrets of what's been done. 

A larger closet we leave 304 

So trouble with coats they will have no more. 

To the Trade School students we leave shops and rooms, 

To keep them clean you'll need plenty of brooms. 

To Mr. Clarke we leave the sheet metal boys 

With all their pounding there's plenty of noise. 

To the mechanics we leave Messrs. Bryan and Bacon; 

They'll send you a bill when the tools are taken. 

With the wood workers, Mr. Sherwood will linger; 

Do as he says and you'll not lose your finger. 



124 . 



To the printers we leave Messrs. Duncan and Mah 

If you think of fooling, they'll change your plan. 

To help you o'er many a weary mile 

We leave you Mr. Whipple's encouraging smile. 

Tb the junior girl who most should need, 

Keby's personality and will to lead. 

To the sophomore girl who needs a foil, 

The sweetness and shyness of Ginny Doyle. 

To the future freshman who enter these ranks, 

The pleasant ways of Mary Banks. 

To the junior who prides herself on pertness, 

A dose of Mary Virginia's alertness. 

To the sophomores who now are coming our way, 

The Barnes' twins attitude lively and gay. 

To the freshman who needs to relax and play, 

Jimmy Scully's easy-going way. 

To the junior who with a roadster deals, 

Mulligan's nerve to drive on two wheels. 

To the freshman who from talking refrain, 

Dick Totman's ability to entertain. 

To the junior who stumbles in fast oratory, 

Ralph Peter's ability to tell a "tall" story. 

To the sophomore, who to us seems quiet, 

Joe Donohuoe's trick of starting a riot. 

To the junior girl who for beauty would clamor, 

A little "oomph" from Polly's glamour. 

To those brave lads who a-hunting would go, 

We leave our Gunn to conduct that show. 

Tb Delorey and Nista our Gatto's skill, 

These boys we're sure can fill the bill. 

For its lively encouragement, we will our band, 

Its lusty music, the best in the land. 

To the maidens fair whose interest is gym, 

A percentage small of Leona's vim. 

To the one who in the office works, 

The skill of Rita who never shirks. 

To the coming students of Weymouth High, 

The gleam in Barbara Stanley's eye. 

To boys, the taste in clothes do lack, 

Here's Jimmy Coyle's with his choice and tact. 

We leave to some deserving "fella", 

The sportsmanship of Peter Lilla. 

Charolette MacLeod will leave to you 

A startling record obtained by few. 



To girls whose dress needs interference, 

Cynthia Cowing's fashionable appearance. 

To one with Miriam McCue's gay chatter, 

Her supply of giggles to increase that clatter. 

To everyone who thinks life worthwhile, 

We leave Joe Lambe's engaging smile. 

To the girl who at her desk doth toil, 

The hearty laugh of Catherine Coyle. 

To those who wait the dismal bell, 

The dash and sprint of Manning Janncll 

To future aspirants of music and song, 

Charlie Cavanagh's power to clang the gong. 

When the football banquet next year approaches, 

We leave a few seats for more junior coaches. 

To the rest of our more or less fortunate friends, 

We leave competent teachers and call it THE END. 

Signed, 

The Class of 1940 
Kenneth Ralph, Class Attorney 



Witnesses: 

Nancy Ness Marion Hanabury 

Rita Bowie James Pearce 

Helen Long Gerald Sheppard 

Marion Fredrickson Harold Thurston 



126 




YOUR CHOICE 
WILL DETERMINE YOUR 
FUTURE 



Compliments of tke 


Class 


of IC)^! 


Spear's Slower Shop 


Walter's Auto Body Repair Co. 


^Broad Street 


i\phuil(iiY\ iC /TPrKpn r^nnips. nr\n T*pn/1pr$ 


Bast Weymouth, Mass. ^el. Wey. 0049 


678 Southern Artery 
Quincy, Mass. 


eJilember Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association 


Walter J. Kosarick, Prop. 

Telephone Granite 4100 




Chase's Pioneer Food Store 


Compliments of 

ELBRIDGE NASH DRUG CO. 


451 Pleasant Street 
South Weymouth, Massachusetts 
Tel. Wey. 2525 

Meats and Groceries 


WILLIAM B. NASH, Jr., Registered Pharmacist 




Columbian Square South Weymouth, Mass 
Established 1875 


C. L. McGAW 

News Dealer and Stationer 
SO. WEYMOUTH MASS. 



SADDLEMASTERS 
FACTORY PRICES 

Factory Shoe Store, Inc. 

(opposite Stetson Shoe Co.) 
South Weymouth, Mass. 


HOWE & FRENCH 

INC. 

Eugene Scioscia 

TAILORING AND PRESSING 

1310 Commercial St., East Weymouth 

Tel. Weymouth 0802 

L. M. MATH I SEN 

Ladies' and Men's Tailoring 
Cleansing - Pressing » Repairing - Dveing 
153 Washington Street, Weymouth 
Telephone Weymouth 0162 


Qompliments of 

LINCOLN BEAUTY SHOP 

Mildred Holmes 

Wey. 15 79- J 


NAPOLEON E. BERGERON 

AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 
Genuine Parts For Carter Carburetor. 
Delco-Remy and Autolite 
290 Washington Street Tel. Wey. 1428 


BOB'S BEAUTY SHOP 

808 Broad Street 
East Weymoutk Mass, 

WELLA PERMANENT^ 


FIRST NATIONAL STORES INC. 

101 Peasant Street 
South ^'eymouth, Mass. 
Grocery Mgr. Alton S. Blanchard 
Meat Mgr. Joseph Lynch 


J. H • MURRAY HARDWARE CO. 
809 Broad Street 
East Weymouth, Mass. 


MILADY'S SHOP 

G. E. STRATH ERN 
The Newest In Womens and Children's 
Hats - Dresses - Acccessories 
REASONABLY PRICED 
23 Washington Square Weymouth, Mass. 
Next to the Post Office 


Dot's Beauty Parlor 

772 Pleasant Street 
Tel. Weymouth 1362-J 


Kitchenware and Cutlery Gifts 

ARTHUR M. JUSTICE 
Hardware 
782 Broad St., East Weymouth, Mass. 

Telephone Wey. 0773-M Free Oeliverv 


Frank Ness 


Jannell Motor Co. 

South Weymouth, Mass. 



Northeastern 
University 

day DIVISION 

College of Liberal A rts 
Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for t he understanding 
of modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. The purpose of this program 
is to give the student a liberal and cultural education and a vocational competence which fits 
him to enter some specific type of useful employment. 

College of Business Administration 
Otters a college program with broad and thorough training in the principles of business 
with specialization in Accounting. Journalism, Banking and Finance, Public Administration. 
Industrial Administration or Marketing and Advertising. Institution is through lectures, solu- 
tion of business problems, class discussions, motion pictures and talks by business men. 

College of Engineering 
Provides complete college programs in Engineering with professional courses in the fields 
of Civil, Mechanical (with Diesel. Aeronautical, and Air Conditioning options) , Electrical, 
Chemical, Industrial Engineering and Engineering Administration. .Students select, at the 
beginning of the sophomore year, the course in which they intend to specialize. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co operative Plan provides for a combination of practical industrial experience with 
classroom instruction. I ppci c lassmen earn a portion of their school expenses and make business 
contacts which prove valuable in later years. 

Degrees Awarded 
Bachelor of Aits Bachelor of Science 



EVENING DIVISION 

(For Mi x \xi> Womi N i 

Providing complete courses of university grade, for high school graduates who find it necessary 
to reotk during the day hut wish l:> study for jurthei advancement . 



School or Bi stxi ss 
Programs in Accounting, Management with 
Merchandising and Industrial options, Law 
and Business Management and in Engineer- 
ing and Business, under instructors actually 
engaged in the fields in which they teach. 
73% of graduates hold executive positions 
in business. Preparation for the C. P. A. 
examinations. School grants B. B. A. and 
B. C. S. degrees. Individual courses available 
to special students. 



Cot t.i c.i or Liberal Arts 
Pre-Legal Training General Education 

A special program conducted in the evening 
by the College of Liberal Arts which pro- 
vides a general education for those who 
cannot attend a day college and is especially 
designed to prepare for admission to the 
Northeastern University School of Law. In- 
dividual courses available to special students. 
The tital of Associate in Arts (A. A.) con- 
ferred. 



Graduates of Weymouth High School may he admitted without examinations if grades are 
satisfactory to the Department of Admission 
FOR CATALOG-MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 
Diriotor of Admissions 
Boston, Massvchitsetts 

Please send me a catalog of the 

College of Liberal Arts 

College of Engineering 

College of Business Administration 



..Evening School of Business 
...Day Pre-Legal Program 
Evening Division— College of Liberal Arts 



Name 
Address 



C-33 



r 

Placement Servict 
Provided Free to all 
Graduates 

NA/here Success Stories of Tomorrow 
Begin to Take Form 

For 61 years, Burdett College has been offering specialized business 
training to the young people of New England. In its five-story, con- 
venient building in downtown Boston, the success stories of tomorrow 
begin to take form. Here young men and women acquire solid foun- 
dations in business fundamentals, in skill subjects, and cultural- 
social studies. They learn to think for themselves, and to think 
straight. Carry hope into achievement by deciding now to learn more 
about Burdett College ... its experienced faculty ... its enviable 
reputation among employers. 

Burdett College 

156 Stuart Street, Boston, Mass. 

k Send for Day or HANcock 6300 Fa.Il Term Begins 

Evening Catalogue September 3, 1940 



LOOKING FOR A DIGNIFIED VOCATION . . . ? 

STUDY BEAUTY CULTURE 

IN ITS MOST ADVANCED FORM 

We prepare young men and women for a life of refinement, 
nteresting work, security and prosperity. COURSES are complete 
and systematized, with sound proven principles correctly applied. 
Our INSTRUCTORS have been carefully prepared to a required 
standard, and each one is a GRADUATE of the ACADEMY itself- 
This feature insures capable presentation of all subjects which are 
essential in any professional training center. CLASSROOMS ar 
spacious and modernly equipped . . an entire building is devote^ 
*or this purpose. The number of high-class positions filled by our 
FREE PLACEMENT BUREAU has increased yearly for more than 
a decade, assured undeniable success to our graduates. 

MODERATE TUITION . . . CONVENIENT PAYMENT TERMS 
DAY AND EVENING CLASSES 
Further information regarding your own Dossibilites in this vocation 

gladly furnished. Write for free booklet- or visit our Academy without 

obligation. 

WILFRED ACADEMY 




Previous Commercial 
T raining Not Re- 
quired for Entrance 





of c diair and beauty Qulture 
492 Boylston St. Boston, Mass. KENmore 0880 



Suffolk University 

All Departments Co-educational 

30 Scholarships available in the Colleges to 1940 High School Graduates Qual- 
ification by Competitive Examination in English or History. 

CULTURAL AND P RE-PROFESSION A L 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS— day, evening and part-time courses leading to 
A.B. degree— 120 semester hours. Pre-professional courses (6os.h.) for Law. 
Journalism and Business Administration. Entrance requirement: 15 acceptable 
college entrance units. Advanced standing for acceptable college credits. 

PROFESSIONAL 

LAW SCHOOL— 4 year day or evening course. Prepares for LL.B degree. Mass. 

Bar examination and law practice. Entrance requirement: 60 s.h. of college 

credits, obtainable in the Pre-Legal Course of the College of Liberal Arts. 
COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM— day or evening course, B.S. in J. degree. Includes 

60 s.h. of Liberal Arts and instruction in all phases of Journalism. 
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION— day or evening course, B.S. 

in B.A. degree. Includes 60 s.h. of Liberal Arts and specialized instruction in 

accounting, advertising, business management. 
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF LAW— 2-year evening course. LL.M. degree. 

Combined Faculties Represent Cultural and Professional 
Instruction of High Quality and Recognized Achievement 
Day and Evening Duplicate Sessions 
Special Summer School Courses 
Moderate Tuition Placement Service 

Convenient Location Modern Fire-proof Building 

Call, write or phone CAPitol 0555 for catalogs and information about scholar- 
ships. 

SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR 

Derne Street on Beacon Hill 
Boston Mass. 



CONGRATULATIONS 
Graduates - Weymouth High School 

You are about to start out in the world to make your own 
career. In wishing each of you the very best of success in your 
various undertakings, may we remind you that the best way 
to meet the opportunity or emergency of tomorrow is to start 
a savings account today. No amount is too small - the prin- 
cipal thing is to start. 




1833 Ck ggMLV ; 1940 



WEYMOUTH SAVINGS BANK 

(A Mutual Savings Bank) 
Washington Square Weymouth, Massachusetts 



NEW ENGLAND BUSINESS SCHOOLS 

470 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Operated by Babson's Statistical Organization, Incorporated 

ACCOUNTING and ECONOMICS 
EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAL COURSES 
INDUSTRIAL and RETAIL BUYING 
STENOGRAPHY and TYPEWRITING 
WORK-STUDY PROGRAM and PLACEMENT BUREAU 



Practical 
Business Training 

Plan your 

year right here 



New England Business Schools 
470 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

Please send me your Catalog 
and particulars concerning courses 



Name. 
Street_ 
City_ 



Am Interested in QDay Courses 

Evening Courses 



Insurance 





South Shore Insurance Agency 
CHARLES H. CHUBBUCK 

45 WASHINGTON SQUARE, WEYMOUTH, MASS. 

Established 1870 



Real Estate 



MEMBER MASSACHUSETTS REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE 
MEMBER QUINCY AND SOUTH SHORE REAL ESTATE BOARD 



Congratulaions 
and best wishes to 
the class of 1940 
from the entire 
personnel at 




Herman Keay, School Representative 



THE REMICK COMPANY 

1571 HANCOCK STREET QUINCY, MASS.